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Today's Features

  • Do you have problems with fire blight, black spot, powdery mildew, Fusarium wilt, early blight and late blight?

    If this is the case plant disease resistant varieties this year! Sure old time favorites are what you are used to but try something different with them this year.

    Mail order catalogues promise a bountiful harvest of fruits and vegetables without much work, but we all know that isn't how it works.

    However, there is one thing that we can do easily that will save us a lot of hassle this summer, variety selection.

  • Doc is a neutered male around 5 years old with long, black and white hair. He is a house cat, litter box trained and front declawed. If you are looking for a cat to hold and enjoy Doc is the one. If your pet is missing, call the shelter-it may be there. For a complete listing of pets with pictures visit adoption@petfinder.com. The shelter reminds pet owners that all cats and dogs should have a rabies shot. To adopt an animal, potential owners must complete an adoption application. The animal shelter accepts stray or unwanted animals.

  • Now that the economy has slid into decline and money is tighter, it seems it's time for us to get back to the basics. What better way to do that than to plant a vegetable garden?

    Mid to late March is an ideal time to plant your cool season or spring garden. Potatoes, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, onions, peas and many other crops can be planted this month. Lettuce can also be planted, however you will want to cover it with remay fabric (tobacco canvas).

  • No other berry crop has gained the popularity of the blueberry.

    I am glad it has earned this distinction because blueberries are actually pretty easy to grow if you provide them with some timely attention.

    Once they are established some late winter pruning and fertilization is all you need to do to keep them in production.

  • Cornbread is comfort food to me-a fond taste memory from my childhood.

    My grandma Dillon made cornbread all the time, lots of different ways. Sometimes she'd make the fried cornbread common around here (she called it "Southern cornbread".)

    She also made regular cornbread in a cast iron skillet and sometimes in cast iron corn stick pans which I still have.

    She even made a special souffle-like cornbread, which she called "spoonbread." It was light and buttery, and sometimes we put gravy on it.

  • It is time to start preparing for the vegetable growing season in earnest: asparagus, potatoes, onions and leeks can be set out now; in a few weeks, as the soil is workable and warms to about 45 degrees, we'll direct seed radishes, turnips, parsnips, beets, carrots, peas, spinach and other greens and lettuces.

    Other cool season crops like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts do better set out in the garden as seedlings.

  • A new U.S. Food and Drug Administration rule could impact the disposal of dead farm animals. The rule, scheduled to go into effect in April, would prevent the use of brains and spinal cords of older cattle for animal food. The new rule covers all cows 30 months and older and is aimed at preventing the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, commonly known as mad cow disease.

  • With the warmer temperatures that we have been experiencing, we are starting to see signs of fleas here at the shelter. On the dogs and cats that have been surrendered or picked up as strays, we are starting to see the first fleas of the season. I was hoping that with the cold temperatures that maybe we would see a decrease in the numbers of fleas and ticks. It's still way too early to tell but maybe the problem won't be as bad as it was last year.

    This week's article will concentrate on flea control and listed below are 10 facts about fleas you may not know.

  • The other day at work, I was surfing the web looking for information on the pet overpopulation problem when I came across these statistics on pet ownership.

    Several things surprised me about the findings, like there are more cats as pets than dogs and the total number of dogs and cats that are kept as pets.

    These statistics were compiled from the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association 2007-2008 National Pet Owners Survey.

    DOGS

    • There are approximately 74.8 million owned dogs in the United States

  • Hank is a great chocolate lab that smiles and loves attention. Once he gets the ball or the frisbee the game is on, he loves to play keep away. Hank needs a home where he will have plenty of space to run. If your pet is missing, call the shelter-it may be there. For a complete listing of pets with pictures visit adoption@petfinder.com. The shelter reminds pet owners that all cats and dogs should have a rabies shot. To adopt an animal, potential owners must complete an adoption application. The animal shelter accepts stray or unwanted animals.