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Government

  • Fourth of July closings

    Several local offices will be closed for the upcoming Fourth of July holiday. The Marion County Clerk Office will be closed Saturday, July 2, and Monday, July 4, due to the state AVIS system shutdown and in observance of the Independence Day holiday. The Marion County Clerk Office is regularly open six days a week at 8:20 a.m., closing at 4:20 p.m. Monday through Friday and at 11:50 a.m. on Saturdays.
    The Marion County Circuit Court Clerk Office, Marion County PVA Office and the Marion County Judge/Executive’s Office will be closed Monday, July 4.

  • Kentucky ponders use of private prisons

    By Morgan Watkins
    The Courier-Journal

    As Kentucky’s prison population rises and county jails become overcrowded, the state may reopen a pair of private prisons to temporarily take in more than 1,600 inmates.
    The state stopped housing inmates in private prisons in 2013, but there has been unexpected growth in the number of state prisoners over the last seven months, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Secretary John Tilley said. State prisons are at capacity, and county jails are housing a record number of state inmates.

  • Marion County has its own probation and parole office now

    Several years ago, Junior Adams of Lebanon was giving a friend a ride to the probation and parole office in Campbellsville when he noticed several people walking alongside the highway. He wondered why they were walking and soon found out it was because they, too, needed to meet with their probation officer but didn’t have transportation.
    “I thought this is a doggone shame that people have to come over here,” Adams said.

  • Flexibility is key for new city hall

    When the design team created the plans for the new city hall in Lebanon, they wanted the building to represent transparency, strength and stability. Beyond what the building represents, however, they wanted a place the community would be proud to call theirs.
    According to Lindsey Tudor, the director of marketing for Murphy+Graves+Trimble, PLLC (MGT), flexibility was the key cornerstone when creating the designs for the new city hall. She stressed that the new facility will have a long future ahead of it.

  • County gives $10,300 to Kentucky Classic Arts

    Kentucky Classic Arts brought more than 20,000 people to Centre Square last year, according to Robin Humphress, and she would like to see the facility used even more in the future. But, in order to do that, Kentucky Classic Arts will need more funding, Humphress told members of the Marion County Fiscal Court during the court’s regular monthly meeting Thursday, June 16.

  • Marion County Fiscal Court to meet Thursday, June 16

    The Marion County Fiscal Court will be having its regular monthly meeting at 4 p.m. today, Thursday, June 16, in room 201 in the David R. Hourigan Government Building.

    The agenda includes the following items of business:

  • Council approves new city hall design

    The Lebanon City Council approved the updated plans for the new city hall after a presentation to the public during the Lebanon City Council’s regular monthly meeting Monday night. Architect Tim Murphy of Murphy+Graves+Trimble, PLLC (MGT), presented the new renderings to the public and to the council. Murphy said the team had the public in mind when creating the mockups for the building.

  • Arena could improve amenities

    “If we build it, they will come.”
    That’s what members of the Marion County Fiscal Court, the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission and the Lebanon City Council believe with regard to building a new multipurpose facility at the Marion County Fairgrounds.
    But, the project goes far beyond just attracting tourists to the area, according to Marion County Economic Development Director Tom Lund, who attended a special-called fiscal court meeting last week.

  • What’s that smell? Odor is coming from rock quarry, should be gone soon

    Anybody traveling into the City of Lebanon has probably noticed a distinct, unpleasant smell as they enter city limits near Wal-Mart.
    Marion County Judge/Executive David Daugherty gave a brief report on the odor during the Marion County Fiscal Court’s regular monthly meeting Thursday, June 9.
    Daugherty said that, according to Cindy Brumitt, environmental scientist  with the Division of Water’s Columbia Regional Office, an iron seam had been hit at the rock quarry off Highway 208, and they were treating it with lime.

  • Next steps for nickel?

    The fate of the recallable nickel could lie in the hands of voters for a second time in eight years after Marion County Clerk Chad Mattingly announced last week that he’s determined the petition protesting the recallable nickel to be “sufficient.”