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Government

  • ‘I really can’t think of a better place to be’

    Marion County Judge/Executive David Daugherty hasn’t given up on his goal of building a multipurpose facility at the fairgrounds, and he took advantage of an opportunity to speak about that project during his “state of the county” address at the Marion County Chamber of Commerce luncheon Thursday, March 23.
    “It’s in the planning phase, but it’s my goal to continue to push it to be done,” he said.

  • County taking delinquent trash accounts to court

    Magistrates voted to begin court proceedings on delinquent sanitation accounts during the Marion County Fiscal Court’s regular monthly meeting March 16.
    Collecting delinquent trash bills has been a constant headache for county government. Last year, Marion County Judge/Executive David Daugherty began digging through the mess, and published a list of delinquent accounts in The Lebanon Enterprise on March 1. According to Daugherty, as of right now, 18 delinquent accounts are going to be taken to court.

    In other matters, magistrates:

  • Sen. Jimmy Higdon is co-chairman of CSG education and workforce development public policy committee

    State Senator Jimmy Higdon has been selected to serve as the co-chairman of The Council of State Governments’ Education and Workforce Development Public Policy Committee. Thirty-two state leaders from 20 states were appointed to positions on CSG’s public policy, standing and special committees, which help to determine CSG’s agenda throughout the year.

  • Fiscal court briefs

    Carol Thompson from the Career Center in Lebanon attended Thursday’s Marion County Fiscal Court meeting and reported that the transition from state to local control was “seamless.”

  • County, city combine resources to save Career Center

    After the state’s unexpected announcement that it would be closing 31 Career Centers, including Marion County’s, local government officials began scrambling to save the center.
    Last week, the Marion County Fiscal Court and the City of Lebanon agreed to partner their resources and each pay $30,000 to keep one of the center’s current full-time employees on staff. The employee’s total salary will be $40,000 plus benefits, according to Marion County Judge/Executive David Daugherty.

  • Kentucky House passes measure to protect young bicyclists

    Last week, the Kentucky House of Representatives passed a bill to create a safety measure aimed at protecting bicyclists under the age of 12 by requiring the use of helmets. The measure was championed by Rep. Regina Bunch, R-Williamsburg.
    “Many serious bicycling injuries suffered by young Kentuckians are preventable, particularly head injuries,” said Rep. Bunch. “When kids wear helmets, it can literally save a life. I want Kentucky kids to have a lifetime of health, and this bill is an effort toward that goal.”

  • Rep. Reed appointed to Tobacco Settlement Agreement Fund Oversight Committee

    State Rep. Brandon Reed, R-Hodgenville, was recently appointed to the House Tobacco Agreement Fund Oversight Committee.  
    The committee is charged with matters pertaining to the Agricultural Development Board such as requests for grants and loans, planning to establish goals, and revitalization of tobacco farms, among other things. In his role, Rep. Reed will also be responsible for developing public institution research in alternative crop development and also giving direction on the use of Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement money in Kentucky.

  • City responds to former police officer’s lawsuit

    The City of Lebanon has filed its response to a lawsuit filed by former Lebanon Police Officer Joseph Aaron Caldwell. Caldwell, who was fired on Oct. 12 after serving as an officer for almost six years, filed the lawsuit on Nov. 7, claiming the city violated KRS 15.520, the Police Officer’s Bill of Rights, and KRS 95.450(2) by terminating Caldwell for a reason other than inefficiency, misconduct, insubordination or violation of law.

  • Fate of Career Center still unknown

    The largest crowd in recent memory attended the Marion County Fiscal Court’s special-called meeting Jan. 25 in hopes of saving the Career Center in Lebanon.
    The state recently announced that it would be closing 31 centers, including Marion County’s, by Feb. 16.

  • County working to keep Career Center open

    In the wake of Career Center closings throughout Kentucky, Marion County officials are scrambling to keep the Lincoln Trail Career Center open, and they only have until Feb. 16 to do it.
    At the Marion County Fiscal Court meeting on Thursday, magistrates agreed to having a special-called meeting today at 5:30 p.m. to discuss the plans to keep the center open past the Feb. 16 closing date.