• Loretto working to fix sewer problems

    The City of Loretto wants to do everything it can to avoid increasing its sewer rates, but that’s going to require some cooperation from its residents.
    Approximately 30 residents attended Thursday’s Loretto City Council meeting to discuss the city’s sewer issues.
    “The goal is to not raise the sewer rates, and it’s getting very close to doing that,” Loretto Mayor Tom Brahm said.

  • Fiscal court helps honor guard get a new ride

    The Marion County Veterans Honor Guard is getting some much-needed financial assistance from the Marion County Fiscal Court to purchase a new bus.
    Paul Powell, a member of the honor guard, addressed the court during its regular monthly meeting Aug. 18. He informed the court that the honor guard has been using their current bus, which is a 1997 model, since 2004. It has more than 217,000 miles on it.
    “It’s in bad shape. We need help,” Powell said.

  • Arena could cost $25 million

    It’s back to the drawing board for those in charge of planning the new multipurpose facility.
    The Multipurpose Facility Committee met on Aug. 15 to discuss the potential blueprints of the facility with engineers, but was slammed with a much larger price tag than previously anticipated. Before, the committee had estimated the cost to be around $4 million, but in their most recent meeting, engineers from CFW Associated Engineers Inc. said the cost could go as high as $25 million.

  • Marion Adjustment Center to reopen

    Because of the overcrowding of jails throughout Kentucky, the state is looking toward private facilities to alleviate some of the stress. According to Marion County Jailer Barry Brady, that means the Marion Adjustment Center will open sometime in the near future.

  • Board tables decision

    After two hours of listening to a heated debate, the City of Lebanon Board of Zoning Adjustments decided to table its decision about allowing a transitional home at 150 E. Main St. Father Bill Bowling is leading the project, and hoped to get a yes vote during the meeting. He was met with a lot of opposition, however, and board members ended the meeting with questions of their own. They finally voted to table the decision so the members could think on the matter further. No date has been set for the next meeting.

  • Overcrowding jail cells

    The Marion County Detention Center is facing a dilemma, as is every other jail in the state of Kentucky and across the nation.
    It’s overcrowded.
    It’s not a unique problem, and the solution is even more difficult to get a handle on. While the number of inmates continues to increase, so does the number of inmates that must be housed in isolation, due to drugs and mental health issues. Isolation needs create even more overcrowding issues for the jail, as well as staffing issues and a financial strain on the facility, which is almost 20 years old.

  • National, state and local races on ballot this November

    Marion County voters will be going to the polls Tuesday, Nov. 8, to cast their ballots in contested races for President of the United States, U.S. Senate, Kentucky House of Representatives, District 24, three districts of the Marion County Board of Education, Lebanon, Loretto and Bradfordsville city councils and Soil Conservation District Board members. Voters will also be voting for or against the Marion County Board of Education’s levy of a recallable nickel to raise funds for school facilities.
    The deadline to register to vote for the General Election is Oct. 11.

  • City council calls for consultant

    Lebanon City Councilman Jay Grundy wants you to know that Lebanon isn’t growing. In fact, according to him, it’s declining by two percent every year. While addressing the council outside of his chair at their meeting on Aug. 8, Grundy made a proposal to the rest of the council members to hire a consultant to figure out a way to boost the population in Lebanon.

  • Council approves advanced training for workers

    The Lebanon City Council recently accepted a proposal to help fund more training for current workers in Lebanon.

  • Needle exchange program could become a reality in Marion County

    There’s no denying that the state of Kentucky has a drug problem.
    Kentucky also leads the nation in acute Hepatitis C rates.
    And, out of 220 counties identified by the Centers for Disease Control, 50 counties in Kentucky are at risk for an HIV outbreak.
    Marion County is not at risk, yet, but we are surrounded by counties that are.