.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Government

  • Jim Gray takes on Rand Paul for senate seat

    It’s election season so that means candidates are scrambling to be heard by any means possible. One of the hotly contested races this year is the United States Senate seat currently held by Senator Rand Paul.
    Paul’s opposition is Jim Gray.
    Gray is the current Mayor of Lexington and has been in office since 2011. He was raised in Glasgow, Kentucky and is proud of the fact that he is a seventh-generation Kentuckian.

  • Council approves bid for new city hall

    The Lebanon City Council held a special called meeting on Monday to discuss the bids for construction of the new city hall.

    There was little discussion before the council voted to approve the lowest bid, which went to Isaac Tatum Construction. At $4.38 million, the project will cost about $1 million more than previously expected by architects from Murphy+Graves+Trimble, PLLC (MGT).
    Lead architect TimMurphy said he didn’t foresee any big variations in the costs.

  • New City Hall could cost $4 million

    Four bids were submitted for the construction of a new city hall in Lebanon, but none of them were within the city’s estimated price range.
    According to City Administrator John Thomas, the architects and committee had estimated the cost to be a little more than $3 million. The lowest bid, which was submitted by Isaac Tatum Construction, was $4,380,000. The other bids ranged from around $4.5 million to nearly $5 million.
    Thomas said the city hall committee will have to meet again to discuss what needs to be done next.

  • Committee explores new options for arena

    After a shocking revelation last month that the new multipurpose facility could cost upwards of $25 million, the committee in charge of the project has decided to go a different route.
    The Multipurpose Facility Committee met again on Sept. 13 to discuss the new plans.

  • No Halloween in the Park this year

    During its regular monthly meeting Sept. 12, the Lebanon City Council voted not to continue Halloween in the Park this year.
    According to Lebanon Police Chief Wally Brady, when the Heartland Coalition first initiated the event, the intent was to eliminate door-to-door trick or treating.
    “Now it’s turned into you go to the park for Halloween in the Park, you get candy, then you leave there and go to Spalding Avenue and get candy again,” he said.

  • Zoning board tables decision

    The Rev. Bill Bowling stared down a large crowd of people, but this wasn’t his usual congregation. Without enough chairs, Lebanon City Hall was packed to the walls with citizens wanting to see what the Board of Zoning Adjustments would decide. Would they allow the house at 150 E. Main St. to become a transitional home or would they deny it?

  • Loretto working to fix sewer problems

    The City of Loretto wants to do everything it can to avoid increasing its sewer rates, but that’s going to require some cooperation from its residents.
    Approximately 30 residents attended Thursday’s Loretto City Council meeting to discuss the city’s sewer issues.
    “The goal is to not raise the sewer rates, and it’s getting very close to doing that,” Loretto Mayor Tom Brahm said.

  • Fiscal court helps honor guard get a new ride

    The Marion County Veterans Honor Guard is getting some much-needed financial assistance from the Marion County Fiscal Court to purchase a new bus.
    Paul Powell, a member of the honor guard, addressed the court during its regular monthly meeting Aug. 18. He informed the court that the honor guard has been using their current bus, which is a 1997 model, since 2004. It has more than 217,000 miles on it.
    “It’s in bad shape. We need help,” Powell said.

  • Arena could cost $25 million

    It’s back to the drawing board for those in charge of planning the new multipurpose facility.
    The Multipurpose Facility Committee met on Aug. 15 to discuss the potential blueprints of the facility with engineers, but was slammed with a much larger price tag than previously anticipated. Before, the committee had estimated the cost to be around $4 million, but in their most recent meeting, engineers from CFW Associated Engineers Inc. said the cost could go as high as $25 million.

  • Marion Adjustment Center to reopen

    Because of the overcrowding of jails throughout Kentucky, the state is looking toward private facilities to alleviate some of the stress. According to Marion County Jailer Barry Brady, that means the Marion Adjustment Center will open sometime in the near future.