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Government

  • Budget shortfall raises spending cut fears in Kentucky

    By Tom Loftus
    The Courier-Journal

  • Gun laws loosen, concealed-carry permits spike

    By Scott Wartman
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    Over the past 10 years, Kentucky has made it easier to carry guns – and statistics show more Kentuckians are carrying concealed firearms than ever before.
    Judging by one of the first few bills filed early for the 2015 session, it doesn’t look like the General Assembly will change direction on guns anytime soon.

  • Federal program will allow Kentucky schools to provide more students with free meals

    By Valarie Honeycutt Spears
    Lexington Herald-Leader

    This fall, all students could receive free meals at some schools in an estimated 100 Kentucky districts, including Fayette, as part of a federal program that has expanded.
    The Community Eligibility Provision, a federal program that started in 2010 as a pilot in Kentucky and other states, will allow schools to provide more students with free meals, no matter their families' incomes.

  • Fiscal court meets Thursday

    The Marion County Fiscal Court is scheduled to meet in regular session at 4 p.m. Thursday on the second floor of the David R. Hourigan Government Building.

    The agenda includes the following items:

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Flex fund and discretionary road fund list/request

    - Annual contract with the Lincoln Trail District health department

  • Special city council meeting Thursday

    The Lebanon City Council is scheduled to hold a special-called meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 19, at city hall.

    The agenda includes the second reading of the amended 2013-14 budget and the second reading of the 2014-15 budget.

    The agenda also includes a resolution in support of a community development block grant application for Lebanon Power and Apparatus.

    The final item is a resolution supporting the condemnation of 200 Boldrick Avenue.

  • Divided board votes to give superintendent 18-month extension to establish residency

    A divided Marion County Board of Education has voted to give Superintendent Taylora Schlosser an additional 18 months to establish her residency in Marion County.

  • Doug Mattingly files as write-in candidate for judge/executive race

    Doug Mattingly lost the Marion County Judge/Executive race to David Daugherty in the May primary election by a large margin, but he’s not giving up just yet.
    Tuesday, June 10, he filed to run as a write-in candidate for the judge/executive’s race in November.
    “I still think I’m the better person for that job,” Mattingly said. “I don’t think it, I know that I’m the better person for that job.”

  • Judge recuses himself in election case

    A hearing was scheduled June 13 in the lawsuit filed over the results of the May 20 Republican primary race for the 24th District state representatives, but the court is no closer to a decision.
    The 24th District includes Green, LaRue and Marion counties.
    David Williams, who is a circuit judge in the 40th Judicial District, had been appointed as a special judge, but he has recused himself from the case.

  • Who spent the most to lobby Frankfort?

    By Scott Wartman
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    Tobacco lobby money in Frankfort poured in this year as statewide smoking ban legislation stagnated.
    No company spent more to lobby Kentucky state legislators this year than tobacco giant Altria, the parent company of Philip Morris Co., spending $156,200 during the General Assembly session that lasted from January to April.
    Some would say it's no coincidence that for the fourth straight year, a statewide smoking ban failed to pass.

  • Kentuckians on both sides of debate over federal nutrition guidelines for school lunches

    By John Moritz
    Lexington Herald-Leader Washington Bureau

    WASHINGTON — Debate in Washington over a controversial school lunch waiver has spread into the Bluegrass State. Proponents say the innocuous proposal helps rural schools, while critics argue that it threatens years of work combating one of the nation's largest childhood obesity rates.