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Government

  • Board tables decision

    After two hours of listening to a heated debate, the City of Lebanon Board of Zoning Adjustments decided to table its decision about allowing a transitional home at 150 E. Main St. Father Bill Bowling is leading the project, and hoped to get a yes vote during the meeting. He was met with a lot of opposition, however, and board members ended the meeting with questions of their own. They finally voted to table the decision so the members could think on the matter further. No date has been set for the next meeting.

  • Overcrowding jail cells

    The Marion County Detention Center is facing a dilemma, as is every other jail in the state of Kentucky and across the nation.
    It’s overcrowded.
    It’s not a unique problem, and the solution is even more difficult to get a handle on. While the number of inmates continues to increase, so does the number of inmates that must be housed in isolation, due to drugs and mental health issues. Isolation needs create even more overcrowding issues for the jail, as well as staffing issues and a financial strain on the facility, which is almost 20 years old.

  • National, state and local races on ballot this November

    Marion County voters will be going to the polls Tuesday, Nov. 8, to cast their ballots in contested races for President of the United States, U.S. Senate, Kentucky House of Representatives, District 24, three districts of the Marion County Board of Education, Lebanon, Loretto and Bradfordsville city councils and Soil Conservation District Board members. Voters will also be voting for or against the Marion County Board of Education’s levy of a recallable nickel to raise funds for school facilities.
    The deadline to register to vote for the General Election is Oct. 11.

  • City council calls for consultant

    Lebanon City Councilman Jay Grundy wants you to know that Lebanon isn’t growing. In fact, according to him, it’s declining by two percent every year. While addressing the council outside of his chair at their meeting on Aug. 8, Grundy made a proposal to the rest of the council members to hire a consultant to figure out a way to boost the population in Lebanon.

  • Council approves advanced training for workers

    The Lebanon City Council recently accepted a proposal to help fund more training for current workers in Lebanon.

  • Needle exchange program could become a reality in Marion County

    There’s no denying that the state of Kentucky has a drug problem.
    Kentucky also leads the nation in acute Hepatitis C rates.
    And, out of 220 counties identified by the Centers for Disease Control, 50 counties in Kentucky are at risk for an HIV outbreak.
    Marion County is not at risk, yet, but we are surrounded by counties that are.

  • Gov. Bevin visits Lebanon

    State and local officials gathered in the Spring View Hospital lobby Tuesday, June 28, to welcome Gov. Matt Bevin for a ceremonial signing of Senate Bill 20. Speakers included the Spring View Hospital CEO Tim Trottier, State Sen. Jimmy Higdon, Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton and Gov. Bevin.
    They discussed how SB 20 would affect hospitals across the state.

  • Fourth of July closings

    Several local offices will be closed for the upcoming Fourth of July holiday. The Marion County Clerk Office will be closed Saturday, July 2, and Monday, July 4, due to the state AVIS system shutdown and in observance of the Independence Day holiday. The Marion County Clerk Office is regularly open six days a week at 8:20 a.m., closing at 4:20 p.m. Monday through Friday and at 11:50 a.m. on Saturdays.
    The Marion County Circuit Court Clerk Office, Marion County PVA Office and the Marion County Judge/Executive’s Office will be closed Monday, July 4.

  • Kentucky ponders use of private prisons

    By Morgan Watkins
    The Courier-Journal

    As Kentucky’s prison population rises and county jails become overcrowded, the state may reopen a pair of private prisons to temporarily take in more than 1,600 inmates.
    The state stopped housing inmates in private prisons in 2013, but there has been unexpected growth in the number of state prisoners over the last seven months, Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Secretary John Tilley said. State prisons are at capacity, and county jails are housing a record number of state inmates.

  • Marion County has its own probation and parole office now

    Several years ago, Junior Adams of Lebanon was giving a friend a ride to the probation and parole office in Campbellsville when he noticed several people walking alongside the highway. He wondered why they were walking and soon found out it was because they, too, needed to meet with their probation officer but didn’t have transportation.
    “I thought this is a doggone shame that people have to come over here,” Adams said.