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Government

  • Chickens still an issue for city

    In May, the Lebanon City Council reaffirmed its support for a ban against raising chickens in city limits. Last week, they got a reminder that poultry is still a problem.
    At the council’s Aug. 12 meeting, Kim Bell of St. Rose Road said one of her neighbors has had chickens for at least two years, and one rooster specifically has caused frequent problems for her.
    "He stays in my yard," she said.

  • County tax rates remain unchanged

    The Marion County Fiscal Court has set its tax rates, and they are the same as they have been for several years.
    On Aug. 15, the magistrates voted 4-0 to keep the rates the same as in 2012. (Magistrate Roger "Cotton" Smothers was not present at last week's meeting.)
    The county's real estate tax rate will remain 8.6 cents per $100 of assessed value. The tangible tax rate and the vehicle property tax rate will both stay at 10.9 cents per $100 valuation.

    Addressing ordinance

  • Redistricting: Round 2

    The Kentucky legislature returned to Frankfort Monday to make another attempt at redefining its districts.
    The issue has lingered over the legislature since 2012, when the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled that the plans approved during that year’s General Assembly were unconstitutional.
    Leading up to the special session that started Monday, legislative leaders from both parties presented redistricting proposals.

  • Fiscal court meets Aug. 15

    The Marion County Fiscal Court is scheduled to meet in regular session at 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, on the second floor of the David R. Hourigan Building.

    The agenda for Thursday's meeting includes the following items:

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Humana presentation on the impact of the Affordable Care Act on insurance plans

    - Resolution/agreement on use of state flex funds for county roads

    - Economic development roadways projects (Village Way, Maker's Mark Road)

  • E911 committee gets update on progress

    Marion County is working toward acquiring enhanced 911 services at a time that will allow the county to take advantage of cost-saving technology.
    Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly discussed the county’s progress during the Lebanon/Marion County E911 Advisory Committee meeting on Aug. 7. The meeting included state and local officials and representatives from the Lincoln Trail Area Development District and Mapsync.

  • City council meets Monday

    The Lebanon City Council is scheduled to meet in regular session at 7 p.m. Monday, Aug. 12, at city hall.

    The agenda for tonight's meeting includes the following:

    - Delegations

    - Minutes of the July 8 meeting

    - Payment of bills

    - Reports

    - Old business

    - New business

    - Declare items surplus/scrap

    - Small wood waste memorandum

    - Sewer video camera lease with the City of Loretto

    - Other business

  • E911 committee discusses addressing requirements

    Emergency services representatives, county and city officials and Lebanon Postmaster Tony Young met July 31 at the David R. Hourigan Government Center to discuss countywide addressing standards.
    County Attorney Joe Mattingly prepared the draft ordinance.
    The discussion covered some suggested changes to the specific language in the ordinance, but the intent is to establish more uniform addressing throughout Marion County, including requiring address numbers to be visibly posted throughout the county.
    The ordinance covers a range of addressing issues, such as:

  • Governor's son representing controversial pipeline company

    By Ryan Quinn
    The State Journal

    Gov. Steve Beshear’s son, attorney Andrew Beshear, is representing a company working to build a controversial natural gas liquids pipeline through Kentucky.
    Andrew Beshear visited the state Public Service Commission with pipeline representatives in April.

  • County says no to Bluegrass Pipeline

    The Marion County Fiscal Court unanimously approved a resolution concerning the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline Thursday, and magistrates voiced their concerns about the impact it could have on the community and its landowners.

  • Thanks to lower spending, small revenue growth, state closes fiscal year with $70M surplus

    Thanks to slowed spending by cash-strapped state agencies, as well as a small bump in General Fund revenues, state Budget Director Jane Driskell announced Friday that Kentucky state government closed the 2012-13 fiscal year with a General Fund surplus of $70.6 million.
    Driskell warned, however, in a state news release that the fiscal year that just began July 1 extends the budget cuts that were in place last year, and that state agencies would continue to be challenged to deliver services with fewer dollars despite rising costs.