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Government

  • Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture visits Lebanon

    Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer stopped by T&H Feed Service on April 9 as part of swing through central Kentucky, in which he visited with store owners and local farmers to chat about agricultural issues. During his visit to Lebanon, Comer spoke briefly about his plans to visit Washington D.C. to lobby in favor of allowing industrial hemp to be grown in Kentucky, his recent visit with EPA regulators in Atlanta, and livestock care standards.

  • Sewer regulations could cost the city loads of money

    The Lebanon wastewater treatment plant could become more costly to operate depending on what requirements are included under a new permit from the Kentucky Division of Water.
    City Administrator John O. Thomas reported at the April 8 Lebanon City Council meeting that the Division of Water might require more frequent testing for metals, particularly copper in the wastewater.
    Eddie Masterson, the city’s wastewater superintendent, explained that the copper comes from old pipes in homes, not from local industries.

  • Passing his papers: Ron Lewis donates documents from time in office to university

    By Ben Sheroan
    Landmark News Service

    The collection of Ron Lewis’ congressional papers – doodles and all – now are part of archives at Campbellsville University’s Montgomery Library.
    A recent dedication service celebrated the accomplishments of the former Baptist preacher from Hardin County who largely was a political unknown when he filed for the 2nd Congressional District seat in a 1994 special election. In his brief remarks, he chose to focus on the constituents.

  • City approves 15 percent water rate increase

    Editor's note: A special-called meeting of the Lebanon City Council has been scheduled for 6 p.m. today, April 17, at city hall. The agenda includes the second reading of the ordinance setting the new water rates and a noise variance for the Color in Motion 5K.

  • Water rate decision on April 15 council meeting agenda

    The Lebanon City Council has scheduled a special-called meeting at 6 p.m. Monday, April 15, at city hall to decide on a request to increase water rates.

    The Lebanon Water Company on April 8 asked the council to approve a 15 percent water rate increase, and after nearly 40 minutes of discussion, the council agreed to meet again April 15.

  • Postal service delays August implementation of five-day mail delivery

    Kentucky Press News Service

    The U.S. Postal System's Board of Governors has announced it will indefinitely delay its planned implementation of five-day mail delivery in the U.S. on Aug. 5.
    The board said restrictive language from Congress prohibits it from reducing the current six-day delivery to five days a week.

  • Water company seeking rate increase

    The Lebanon Water Company made a request to the Lebanon City Council Monday to increase its water rates by 15 percent. If approved, this would be the water company’s first rate increase in seven years.

  • Garbage not up for grabs

    Marion County Solid Waste Coordinator Keith Brock is reminding the public that it is against the law to go through other people’s trash.
    Brock told the Marion County Fiscal Court during its April 4 meeting that the county has been receiving complaints about a few individuals rummaging through trash placed on the curb and looking for recyclables. Brock is running an advertisement to remind the public that this is illegal under the county’s ordinances.

  • YOUR MONEY AT WORK: Community agents

    Editor’s note: This is the fourth story in a series about the seven special districts serving Marion County, as identified by the State Auditor’s Office as part of an effort to increase public awareness of how their money is spent. The Enterprise is taking a closer look at the special districts that serve Marion County, how they are funded, and what they do for the community.

    Marion County extension agents are ready for your questions.

  • Road slide closes part of Ky. 247

    Landmark News Service

    The state Transportation Cabinet has closed part of Howardstown Road (Ky. 247) because of a road slide that worsened over the weekend.

    The section closed to through traffic until further notice is 1.5 miles south of Big Lick Hollow Road and 2.3 miles north of Ky. 84.

    A press release sent out Monday by the cabinet said Department of Highways crews have been monitoring the deteriorating conditions for weeks, but the conditions have been aggravated by recent rains.