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Government

  • Water rate decision on April 15 council meeting agenda

    The Lebanon City Council has scheduled a special-called meeting at 6 p.m. Monday, April 15, at city hall to decide on a request to increase water rates.

    The Lebanon Water Company on April 8 asked the council to approve a 15 percent water rate increase, and after nearly 40 minutes of discussion, the council agreed to meet again April 15.

  • Postal service delays August implementation of five-day mail delivery

    Kentucky Press News Service

    The U.S. Postal System's Board of Governors has announced it will indefinitely delay its planned implementation of five-day mail delivery in the U.S. on Aug. 5.
    The board said restrictive language from Congress prohibits it from reducing the current six-day delivery to five days a week.

  • Water company seeking rate increase

    The Lebanon Water Company made a request to the Lebanon City Council Monday to increase its water rates by 15 percent. If approved, this would be the water company’s first rate increase in seven years.

  • Garbage not up for grabs

    Marion County Solid Waste Coordinator Keith Brock is reminding the public that it is against the law to go through other people’s trash.
    Brock told the Marion County Fiscal Court during its April 4 meeting that the county has been receiving complaints about a few individuals rummaging through trash placed on the curb and looking for recyclables. Brock is running an advertisement to remind the public that this is illegal under the county’s ordinances.

  • YOUR MONEY AT WORK: Community agents

    Editor’s note: This is the fourth story in a series about the seven special districts serving Marion County, as identified by the State Auditor’s Office as part of an effort to increase public awareness of how their money is spent. The Enterprise is taking a closer look at the special districts that serve Marion County, how they are funded, and what they do for the community.

    Marion County extension agents are ready for your questions.

  • Road slide closes part of Ky. 247

    Landmark News Service

    The state Transportation Cabinet has closed part of Howardstown Road (Ky. 247) because of a road slide that worsened over the weekend.

    The section closed to through traffic until further notice is 1.5 miles south of Big Lick Hollow Road and 2.3 miles north of Ky. 84.

    A press release sent out Monday by the cabinet said Department of Highways crews have been monitoring the deteriorating conditions for weeks, but the conditions have been aggravated by recent rains.

  • Cooperative spirit affected 2013 General Assembly

    The 2013 General Assembly wrapped up with two days State Rep. Terry Mills described as “hectic, contentious and productive.”
    "The taxpayers got their money's worth for those two days, anyway," he said.
    On March 27-28, legislators stayed in session until midnight working on compromises on a variety of issues, including pension reform, which both parties agreed was the top priority for this session.

  • Kentucky earns high marks in transparency of government spending

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – Kentucky is once again rated as one of the best states for transparency and public accountability by a new national report.
    Kentucky received an A- for its transparency website, www.opendoor.ky.gov, which allows citizens to review state government spending. Kentucky is considered one of seven top states in transparency, according to the newly released report: Following the Money 2013: How the States Rank on Providing Online Access to Government Spending Data.

  • Kentucky earns high marks in transparency of government spending

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – Kentucky is once again rated as one of the best states for transparency and public accountability by a new national report.
    Kentucky received an A- for its transparency website, www.opendoor.ky.gov, which allows citizens to review state government spending. Kentucky is considered one of seven top states in transparency, according to the newly released report: Following the Money 2013: How the States Rank on Providing Online Access to Government Spending Data.

  • YOUR MONEY AT WORK: Marion County Soil Conservation District - For farm and home alike

    Editor’s note: This is the third story in a series about the seven special districts serving Marion County, as identified by the State Auditor’s Office as part of an effort to increase public awareness of how their money is spent. The Enterprise is taking a closer looking at the special districts that serve Marion County, how they are funded, and what they do for the community.

    At first, the Marion County Soil Conservation District may seem like it only benefits the agricultural community, but it exists to serve the entire county.