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Government

  • Keeping the bourbon flowing

    By Scott Wartman

    The Kentucky Enquirer

    The growing popularity of bourbon has sparked big dreams along the Ohio River and among the state’s leaders in Frankfort.

  • Beshear signs bill approving tax break for farmer donation to food banks

     

  • Marion County receiving $268,000 for asphalt rehab

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has announced more than $27 million in asphalt rehabilitation projects across the state. Marion County is one of the 45 counties approved to receive a portion of those funds.
    Marion County will received $268,882 for work on two sections of KY 49, including a 1.2-mile section from East Main Street to Mannsville Road and a 1.3-mile section from Popes Creek Bridge to Caney Creek Bridge.
    Nally and Hayden Surfacing was awarded the contract for these projects.

  • Head Start officials explain transportation changes

    Local Head Start officials addressed concerns about a new transportation policy with Marion County Fiscal Court at the court’s April 18 meeting.
    Pam Smith, the Marion County Head Start director, and Lynne Robey, the director of Central Kentucky Community Action, spoke about the new transportation policy that will take effect during the 2013-14 academic year. Community Action oversees the Head Start program.

  • City council approves second reading on water rate increase

    The Lebanon City Council approved the second reading of a proposed 15 percent water rate increase during a special-called meeting April 17.
    Under the proposal, in-town Lebanon Water Company customers would pay a $6.75 monthly meter charge and a volume rate of $2.50 per 100 cubic feet of water. An average in-town bill (about 4,000 gallons/535 cubic feet of water per month) would increase from $17.43 to $20.10 per month.

  • YOUR MONEY AT WORK: Marion County Health Center works for healthy, safe community

    Editor’s note: This is the sixth story in a series about the seven special districts serving Marion County, as identified by the State Auditor’s Office as part of an effort to increase public awareness of how their money is spent. The Enterprise is taking a closer look at the special districts that serve Marion County, how they are funded, and what they do for the community.

    The Marion County Health Center wants you to be healthy.

  • Fiscal court to meet Thursday, April 18

    The Marion County Fiscal Court is scheduled to meet in regular session at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 18, at the David R. Hourigan Government Building.

    The agenda includes the following items:

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Proclamation of “Lebanon Middle School To Watch Day,” April 24, 2013

    - Request for Bradfordsville youth athletics program allocation

    - State KYEM – mutual  aid and assistance agreement

  • Tourist commission to meet Thursday, April 18

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission is scheduled to meet in a special-called meeting at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, April 18, in Room 300 of the Centre Square Convention Center.

    The agenda includes the following items:

    - Mission statement

    - Designate a budget committee

    - Budget proposal

    - Marketing plan proposal

    - Interim phase daily operations and compensation

    - Revisit the bylaws on interim phase liabilities

    - Kentucky Baroque Trumpets

    - Executive session under KRS 61.810(f) 

  • Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture visits Lebanon

    Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer stopped by T&H Feed Service on April 9 as part of swing through central Kentucky, in which he visited with store owners and local farmers to chat about agricultural issues. During his visit to Lebanon, Comer spoke briefly about his plans to visit Washington D.C. to lobby in favor of allowing industrial hemp to be grown in Kentucky, his recent visit with EPA regulators in Atlanta, and livestock care standards.

  • Sewer regulations could cost the city loads of money

    The Lebanon wastewater treatment plant could become more costly to operate depending on what requirements are included under a new permit from the Kentucky Division of Water.
    City Administrator John O. Thomas reported at the April 8 Lebanon City Council meeting that the Division of Water might require more frequent testing for metals, particularly copper in the wastewater.
    Eddie Masterson, the city’s wastewater superintendent, explained that the copper comes from old pipes in homes, not from local industries.