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Government

  • Trash talk: Garbage bill could increase

    Marion County residents may see an increase in their garbage fees in the near future.

    During the April 5 Marion County Fiscal Court meeting, Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly announced that the Nelson County Fiscal Court is increasing its fees for disposing of waste at the Nelson County landfill.

    Starting July 1, Marion County will be charged $11.45 per cubic yard of compacted trash delivered to the Nelson County landfill.

  • One day left for legislature

    Both houses of the Kentucky General Assembly have approved more than 130 bills so far during the 2012 regular session, and Governor Steve Beshear has signed 28 of them into law.

    Those new laws cover a range of topics - from alternate high school diplomas for students with disabilities - to sewer collection charges and pharmacy audits.

  • Fiscal court meets Thursday, April 5

    The Marion County Fiscal Court is scheduled to meet at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 5, in the David R. Hourigan Government Building.

    The agenda for today's meeting includes:

    - Minutes of the previous meeting.

    - Budget transfers

    - Resolutions for National Autism Awareness Month in Marion County and proclaiming of April 23-29 as the Centennial Celebration of Ursuline Education and Ministry in Marion County,

    -   Transfer of funds for Marion County WMA to KDFW to Administer

  • County offices to close early Friday

    Several Marion County services will be affected by the Easter weekend, Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly has announced.

    The Marion County Road Department will run a shortened sanitation work schedule on Friday, April 6. The department will close as soon as the routes are finished that day, and the garbage trucks may run earlier than usual on Friday. Residents are asked to put their trash out earlier than normal for pick up on Friday morning.

  • Hemp, Hemp Hooray

    Terry Mills normally asks questions during meetings of the Kentucky House of Representatives Agriculture Committee, but recently, he found himself on the other side of the table, answering questions about legalizing industrial hemp.
    Mills and State Sen. Joey Pendleton, D-Hopkinsville, have introduced similar legislation in their respective houses in the hopes of making industrial hemp a legal cash crop again across the Bluegrass State.
    "It's not to promote marijuana," Mills stressed in his comments to the committee.

  • Over a barrel

    The Marion County Fiscal Court and Beam Global are at a crossroads. The question is whether they will choose to follow the same path.

    Beam Global has plans to build new warehouses for Maker's Mark, but where those warehouses are built will depend on what incentives communities are willing to offer. Beam Global is seeking a 30-year tax abatement that could mean a difference of tens of millions of dollars.

  • Jim Beam warehouses remain under discussion

    Local officials remain in contact with the Beam Company about the possible construction of additional Maker's Mark warehouses. During the March 6 Marion County Industrial Foundation meeting, Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly said they have told distillery representatives that they would like the warehouses to be built here.
    Mattingly added that Beam officials have asked for improvements on the road leading to Maker's Mark in anticipation of increased tourist traffic in that area.
    In other matters:

  • County residents should know radon levels

    You can't avoid it completely, and it can cause cancer. However, you can take steps to reduce your exposure to it.
    "It" is radon, and it is common in central Kentucky.
    "The radon that's in Marion County is here as a result of the geology, specifically the black shale," said Keith Brock, the Marion County Solid Waste and Environmental Coordinator.
    Radon is produced by the natural decay of uranium, which is found in nearly all soils, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

  • BBB tips on storm relief donations

    In the wake of severe storms that came through the Midwest and South, the BBB offers the following tips to help Americans decide where to direct donations to assist storm victims and their families:
    Be cautious when giving online.
    Be cautious about online giving, especially in response to spam messages and emails that claim to link to a relief organization. If you are seeking to give to an organization involved in relief efforts, go directly to the charity’s Web site.

  • Blandford served as Sen. Higdon’s page