.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Government

  • Tourist commission to meet Jan. 9

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission is scheduled to meet in regular session at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, in room 300 at the Centre Square Convention Center.

    The agenda for the meeting includes the following items:

    - Kandice Engle-Gray to discuss the lease agreement with the City of Lebanon

    - Don Johnson regarding the Kentucky Baroque Trumpets

    - Suzi O'Daniel regarding the Heart of Kentucky Antique and Craft Show

  • Lebanon City Council meets Monday, Jan. 9

    The Lebanon City Council is scheduled to meet in regular session at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, at city hall, 118 S. Proctor Knott Avenue.

    The agenda is as follows:

    - Delegation from the United Concerned Citizens regarding the Dr. Martin Luther King March.

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Payment of bills

    - Reports

    - Old business

  • Assistance available for low-income families with a heating crisis

    Beginning today, Jan.4, your local Community Action office will be assisting families of low-income with the LIHEAP Crisis Program.
    To be eligible for Crisis funds you must be in a heating crisis. You must have a past due/disconnect notice from the electric or natural gas company or be out of bulk fuel within four days if using propane, fuel oil or kerosene, or wood, or a formal eviction notice from your landlord if heating expenses are included in the rent.

  • General reassembly

    When the General Assembly meets in 2012, redistricting based on the 2010 Census data will be one of the major items on their agenda. The legislators will be redrawing the boundaries for the Kentucky House of Representatives and Senate and the state U.S. Congressional districts.

    "I don't think the House and Senate districts will be as contentious as the Congressional districts," State Rep. Terry Mills said.

  • Congressman to hold listening session Jan. 11

    Congressman Brett Guthrie will stop by Marion County next week to hear from his constituents. Guthrie will hold a listening session at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 11, at the Marion County Extension Office, 415 Fairgrounds Road in Lebanon.

    Guthrie represents Kentucky's Second Congressional District, which includes Marion County.

  • Congressman to hold listening session Jan. 11

    Congressman Brett Guthrie will stop by Marion County next week to hear from his constituents. Guthrie will hold a listening session at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 11, at the Marion County Extension Office, 415 Fairgrounds Road in Lebanon.

    Guthrie represents Kentucky's Second Congressional District, which includes Marion County.

  • Fiscal Court to meet Jan. 5

    The Marion County Fiscal Court will meet in regular session at 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5, at the David R. Hourigan Government Center.
    Here are the items on the agenda:
    - Minutes of Dec. 15 meeting
    - Clerk's redistricting assistance request with Lincoln Trail Area Development District  
    - Clerks' budget for 2012
    - Department reports
    - Preliminary radon abatement proposal for the David R. Hourigan Government Center
    - Payment of bills  
    - New  Business /  Old  Business:

  • Time changed for legislative breakfast Jan. 4

    The legislative lreakfast hosted by the Marion County Chamber of Commerce has been changed to begin at 7 a.m. Jan. 4. The breakfast will be held on the third floor of the Centre Square Convention Complex.

    State Senator Jimmy Higdon and State Representative Terry Mills recently received notice they will be due in Frankfort later that morning.
     

  • Take a hike

    The renovation of the Cecil B. Gorley Naturalist Trail isn't quite complete, but the trail is suitable for walking again.
    "It's a beautiful trail," said Wayne Keen, the interim executive director of the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission.
    The 3.2-mile trail follows the outline of the Fagan Branch Reservoir, 370 Fagan Branch Road in Lebanon.

  • 46 inmates set for early release from MAC, county jail

    When Gov. Steve Beshear signed HB 463 into law in March, he praised it as a bipartisan piece of legislation aimed at addressing a problem hurting Kentucky "financially and socially."
    The law has been hailed as a cost-saving measure at a time with the state government is hurting for revenue. State officials have estimated it will save the state $420 million over the next 10 years.