• School board removes residency requirement for superintendent

    The Marion County Board of Education tackled a variety of issues during its June 11 meeting, including changing a requirement in Superintendent Taylora Schlosser's contract.

    The board voted 3-2 in favor of removing a residency requirement from Schlosser's contract. Chairman Mike Cecil and board members Butch Cecil and Rev. DeLane Pinkston supported amending the contract. Board members Jerry Evans and Kaelin Reed opposed the change.

  • Student, staff drug testing and superintendent's residency requirement on school board agenda

    The Marion County Board of Education is scheduled to hold a regular meeting at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 11, at the board office.

    The agenda includes discussions of student and staff drug testing and a proposal to amend the superintendent's contract to remove the residency requirement.

    The agenda includes the following items:

    I. Call to order

    II. Pledge of Allegiance/moment of silence

    III. Amend agenda 

    IV. Communications

    - Superintendent report 

  • Fiscal court supports bloodborne pathogen ordinance

    On June 4, the Marion County Fiscal Court heard a proposal for a bloodborne pathogen education ordinance, which would affect tattoo artists and body piercers if approved.
    Pablo Munoz, the environmental director for the Lincoln Trail District Health Department, said the ordinance would require any tattoo artist or body piercer to go through a bloodborne pathogen education course approved by Lincoln Trail and meeting Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards.

  • GES principal selection committee meets today

    The Glasscock Elementary School principal selection committee has scheduled a special-called meeting for 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 9, in the conference room.

    The agenda includes the following:

    • Call to rder

    • Minutes

    • Review training

    • Formulate interview questions

  • Glasscock Elementary site-based council seeks input in principal search

    The Glasscock Elementary Site-Based Decision Making Council completed training to conduct a search for the school's next principal. 

    On June 9, the council will be reviewing applications, setting up interviews for principal candidates and developing interview questions, and the council would like help from the community, according to Todd Farmer, the chairman of the principal search committee. Farmer also serves as the federal programs director for Marion County Public Schools.

  • Special Lebanon City Council meeting to be held Monday

    The Lebanon City Council will have a budget work session at 6 p.m. Monday, June 1, at City Hall.

    Lebanon Mayor Gary Crenshaw gave his annual budget address May 21.

    His proposed $9.6 million includes several major requests, including a three percent raise for all city employees and a new city hall.

  • Part of Short Line Pike will close starting June 1 for bridge replacement

    A portion of KY 1195 (Short Line Pike) will be closed June 1 for bridge replacement work. The part of the road near mile point 1 in Marion County, just north of US 68 over Cartwright's Creek, will be closed while the repairs are taking place.

    Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials estimate the work will be complete by Aug. 1.

  • Special-called school board meeting Thursday morning

    The Marion County Board of Education has scheduled a special-called meeting at 11 a.m. Thursday, May 28, at the board of education office, 755 E. Main Street in Lebanon.

    The agenda for the meeting includes the following:

    • Call to order

    • Pledge of Allegiance/moment of silence

    • Communications

    - Strategic planning summit follow-up

    • Student support

    - Approval of FY2016 tentative budget

  • Mayor requests new city hall, 3 percent raise for employees in budget address

    It took fewer than 15 minutes for Lebanon Mayor Gary Crenshaw to give his annual budget address Thursday evening, May 21. However, it’s just the first step in getting his proposed $9.6 million budget approved, which includes several major requests and a three percent raise for all city employees.
    “Employee compensation is an important issue that always gets much debate in our budget review sessions,” Crenshaw said. “The figures you have before you incorporate a three percent raise.”

  • City attorney: Accounting inadequate, not criminal

    The City of Lebanon’s Public Works Department, which was named “Service Industry of the Year” at the Marion County Industry Appreciation Banquet last year, has been under scrutiny recently after an allegation that members of the department were stealing money from the city.
    According to Lebanon City Attorney Kandice Engle-Gray, that allegation has proven to be false, but it has revealed a poorly executed policy and inadequate record keeping.