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Local News

  • Biding his time

    March 11 will mark the 15-year anniversary of when Aaron Glasscock woke up to Drug Enforcement Administration agents storming into his hotel room in Gainesville, Fla., and arresting him for conspiracy to distribute cocaine.
    At that very moment, Aaron’s life, and the life of his family, was forever changed.
    “When the D.E.A. agents came in that morning everything I thought I knew, and my life in general, was turned upside down, and then shook,” Aaron wrote in a letter.

  • Life’s breath

    Cara Cissell Brahm is waiting – and hoping – that some day soon she'll be breathing a little easier.
    Since this summer, she has been on the list to receive a double lung transplant.
    Cara, 37, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when she was 10 years old. Two of her sisters (both older) were also diagnosed with the condition.
    “It mostly affects the lungs, but it can also affect the digestive system and the pancreas,” she said.
    Mindy died in 1999. Another sister, Lisa, received a transplant two and a half years ago.

  • Three seeking to represent District 3

    Magistrate Roger “Cotton” Smothers would like another term on the Marion County Fiscal Court, but two challengers — Dudley Adle Jr. and Craig Bishop — are hoping District 3 voters are looking to make a change.
    Democratic voters will have their pick of those three candidates in the May 20 Primary Election.
    All three candidates sat down with the Enterprise recently to discuss their candidacies. (Transcripts of those interviews can be found online at www.lebanonenterprise.com.)

    Dudley Adle Jr.

  • Lebanon Main Street/WSLK Dickens Christmas is Friday, Nov. 28
  • Bradfordsville is gearing up for Christmas

    The best decorated house and businesses of Bradfordsville will be judged on Thursday, Dec. 4, beginning at 6 p.m. If you are within Bradfordsville city limits, your home or business will be judged. If you are outside of the city limits you will need to call Amy Purdom to be included in the judging at 270-337-4911.
    This year the ham and turkey meal will be at the Bradfordsville Civic Center on Saturday, Dec. 6. The Christmas in the Country parade will be on Saturday, Dec. 6. Call Loni Clarkson to be included in the parade at 270-337-2113.

  • Christmas in the Park is Nov. 26

    Christmas in the Park will take place at Graham Memorial Park in Lebanon Wednesday, Nov. 26.
    The event will officially begin at 6:30 p.m., with free cookies, popcorn and hot chocolate. The lighting of the park will be at 7 p.m. Santa Claus will arrive on one of Lebanon's finest fire trucks at 7:15 p.m.
    The park staff invites you to come out and visit with Santa, enjoy refreshments and walk the track taking in all of the beautiful displays sponsored or donated by local merchants and individuals.

  • Toy, hat and glove drive

    The Lebanon Police Department is partnering with Central Kentucky Community Action and 100.9 WLSK for toy, hat and glove drive for three and four-year-old children. Donations can be placed in a drop box in the lobby of the Lebanon Police Department. The deadline to donate is Dec. 18.

     

  • Lebanon man indicted for sodomy, incest

    Steven D. Williams, 41, of 825 Raywick Road in Lebanon was indicted in Marion Circuit Court recently for first-degree sodomy (two counts), incest (two counts) and second-degree persistent felony offender.

  • Taking chances

    What do Rascal Flatts, Jason Aldean and Brooks and Dunn all have in common?
    They are some of country music’s biggest stars, and they all know where Lebanon, Kentucky is thanks to their manager and Marion County native Clarence Spalding.
    “Everybody in this town knows where Lebanon, Kentucky is,” Spalding said with a laugh during a telephone interview with the Enterprise recently. “Lebanon is a huge part of who I am.”

  • Jail looking to go leaner, greener

    The Marion County Detention Center is the first jail in the United States to receive a grant for a “jail sustainability assessment” from the National Institute of Corrections.
    The assessment will take place over the course of three days and will look at every possible way the detention center can cut costs, and hopefully, serve as a model for other facilities. Monday morning, the jail hosted an opening ceremony to kick-off the assessment