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Local News

  • Biding his time

    March 11 will mark the 15-year anniversary of when Aaron Glasscock woke up to Drug Enforcement Administration agents storming into his hotel room in Gainesville, Fla., and arresting him for conspiracy to distribute cocaine.
    At that very moment, Aaron’s life, and the life of his family, was forever changed.
    “When the D.E.A. agents came in that morning everything I thought I knew, and my life in general, was turned upside down, and then shook,” Aaron wrote in a letter.

  • Life’s breath

    Cara Cissell Brahm is waiting – and hoping – that some day soon she'll be breathing a little easier.
    Since this summer, she has been on the list to receive a double lung transplant.
    Cara, 37, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when she was 10 years old. Two of her sisters (both older) were also diagnosed with the condition.
    “It mostly affects the lungs, but it can also affect the digestive system and the pancreas,” she said.
    Mindy died in 1999. Another sister, Lisa, received a transplant two and a half years ago.

  • Three seeking to represent District 3

    Magistrate Roger “Cotton” Smothers would like another term on the Marion County Fiscal Court, but two challengers — Dudley Adle Jr. and Craig Bishop — are hoping District 3 voters are looking to make a change.
    Democratic voters will have their pick of those three candidates in the May 20 Primary Election.
    All three candidates sat down with the Enterprise recently to discuss their candidacies. (Transcripts of those interviews can be found online at www.lebanonenterprise.com.)

    Dudley Adle Jr.

  • Farm Bureau to host legislative forum Jan. 31

    Marion County Farm Bureau will be hosting its annual legislative forum at 8:30 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 31, in the Farm Bureau conference room at 690 Metts Drive, Lebanon. Joining them will be the Marion County Cattlemen’s Association and Central Kentucky Ag Credit.
    Senator Jimmy Higdon and State Rep. Terry Mills will be on hand to discuss current issues in state government.
    All interested constituents are invited to this open meeting. The legislators will be available for questions from the public.
     

  • Hibbett Sporting Goods, Inc. scheduled to open in May
  • Stillhouse sprinkler burst

    On Jan. 9, The Stillhouse in downtown Lebanon experienced some water problems, which were reported to the Lebanon Police when water was seen coming out of the doors.
    “It was just a sprinkler head,” said Taylora Schlosser, co-owner of The Stillhouse.
    She said the building did not receive too much damage as a result of the leak.
     

  • Tracking progress

    Superintendent Taylora Schlosser reviews the goals for the school district during each regular meeting of the Marion County Board of Education.
    One of the goals is for all students in every school to receive a comparable education. This is a priority for the Kentucky Department of Education as well.
    "Basically, it charges site-based councils and boards to actually look at different groups of kids to make sure that every group is performing at a high level," Schlosser said.

  • Heroin will be a focus in 2015 General Assembly

    State legislators met earlier this month primarily to address procedural matters, and they will return for this year's short session on Feb. 3.
    But one issue that has support across party lines and branches of the government is curbing the heroin epidemic in Kentucky. Three years ago, a new state law made it more difficult for "pills mills" to operate in Kentucky, but there was another consequence.
    "As a result heroin became cheaper, more widespread," State Representative Terry Mills said.

  • Perfect 10th

    Jeremy Bowman has had a unique view of the Kentucky Bluegrass Music Kickoff, serving as the emcee since the festival started in 2005 at Centre Square.
    "Did I think we'd stick it out 10 years? That night I didn't," he said. "But I'm sure glad we did."
    If this weekend is any indication, they'll still be holding the KBMK for years to come.

  • 2 separate bills in House and Senate could make medical marijuana a reality

    By Brad Bowman
    Frankfort State Journal

    After going through a gauntlet of steroids, muscle relaxers, chemotherapy, interferon injections and opiates to manage his multiple sclerosis, Jaimie Montalvo found using marijuana less debilitating than the side effects of his prescription medications.
    Two separate bills in the House and Senate could make medical marijuana a legal reality for many like Montalvo in Kentucky, who see it as an alternative to the unwanted side effects from addictive opiates commonly prescribed by physicians.