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Local News

  • How to show your appreciation to members of the military

    Civilians who join the military find their lives change forever upon entering the service. The armed forces shape a person, teaching discipline, humility, bravery, and many other life lessons. Joining the military often means making substantial personal sacrifices, as servicemen and women are typically called away from their families and the comforts of home.

  • School board meets tonight

     The Marion County Board of Education is scheduled to meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, at the board office.

    The agenda includes the following:

    COMMUNICATIONS

    - Introduction of Newly Elected Board Members

    - New Board Member’s Oath of Office

    - Audit Report – White & Company

    - Superintendent’s Report

    - PGES Update – Tammy Newcome

    - Financial Report – Lisa Caldwell

    STUDENT LEARNING SERVICES

    - Consider approval of 2015 Board Meeting Schedule

  • Loretto man injured in Friday morning accident

    A Loretto man is being treated at University Hospital in Louisville after a single-vehicle accident Friday morning. His condition was not available as of 1:30 p.m.

    Chad Allen Mattingly, 32, was ejected from his vehicle after it struck a guardrail on Hwy. 152 and overturned, according to the Marion County Sheriff's Office.

  • Fiscal court meets today

     The Marion County Fiscal Court will meet in regular session at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 16, on the second floor of the David R. Hourigan Government Center.

    The agenda includes the following items:

    • Minutes of the previous meeting

    • Second reading of a budget amendment 

    • Consider request from Central Kentucky Classic Arts

    • Revised agreement on the Maker’s Mark roadway project

    • Appointment to Gravel Switch Volunteer Fire Department Advisory Committee

  • Mattingly resigns as school board attorney

    Joe Mattingly has resigned as the attorney for the Marion County Board of Education after one of his employees was elected to the board.
    Kaelin Reed, who works at the Mattingly and Nally-Martin law firm, was elected as the District 2 board member during the Nov. 4 election. Reed previously resigned from his position as assistant county attorney on Oct. 31, noting in his resignation letter that he was prohibited from being the assistant county attorney as a school board candidate.

  • Vigil will mark anniversary of deputy's death

    The Marion County Sheriff's Office is hosting a candlelight vigil at 6 p.m. Nov. 14 to mark the second anniversary of the death of Deputy Sheriff Anthony Rakes.
    The event will also serve as the dedication of a monument at the David R. Hourigan Government Building to emergency service personnel who were killed in the line of duty.

  • Wreaths Across America event is Dec. 13

    National nonprofit Wreaths Across America is working hard to ensure no veteran from Marion County is forgotten this holiday season. At noon on Dec. 13, National Wreaths Across America Day, live, balsam remembrance wreaths will be placed at the headstones of fallen veterans at nearly 1,000 locations across the country and overseas. Locally, a remembrance ceremony will be held at The Lebanon National Cemetery, on this day to ensure that the individuals buried there, who served to protect the freedoms of our country are not, and never will be, forgotten.

  • Breathing easier

    After years of struggling for each and every breath, Cara Brahm got new lungs and a new lease on life on Sept. 8 — two days before her 38th birthday.
    She had been on the waiting list for an organ donation for 11 months.
    "Progressively I got worse with my breathing and my oxygen level. [My] lung function was dropping ... a lot of chores, I just had to stop doing," Brahm said.
    Brahm was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis when she was 10 years old and as it continued to take a toll on her lungs, even simple acts like getting dressed required help.

  • Possible Civil War site identified at local factory

    Many of Lebanon’s connections to the Civil War have been well documented.
    Historic markers note that John Hunt Morgan and his raiders attacked the city multiple times. Gen. George H. Thomas (who has his own statue) had an office downtown, and many Civil War veterans are buried at the Lebanon National Cemetery.
    The train depot that once operated here made Lebanon a strategic point for transporting troops and supplies during the war.
    But some pieces of the city’s Civil War era history are still being uncovered.

  • Health official: Focus on flu, not Ebola

    In spite of all the media attention on the Ebola virus, Kentuckians should be paying more attention to a more likely infection, the flu, according to health officials.
    “Flu season is upon us. We know it’s coming, yet we still have people die in Kentucky every year,” said Pablo Munoz, the director of environment with the Lincoln Trail Health District.
    According to the Centers for Disease Control, an average of 23,000 people die annually from influenza and more than 200,000 are hospitalized with flu complications.