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Local News

  • Sounding the trumpets

    The man considered by many to be the finest baroque trumpeter in the world performed to a small but appreciative audience Saturday evening in Lebanon.
    Friedemann Immer of Germany joined Kentucky Baroque Trumpets for the second time June 21 for a concert at St. Augustine Church before an audience of around 50 people.
    “Friedemann, he’s just unbelievable. He makes us all better just playing with him,” said Don Johnson, the director and founder of Kentucky Baroque Trumpets.

  • Budget shortfall raises spending cut fears in Kentucky

    By Tom Loftus
    The Courier-Journal

  • Curbing carbon could help improve air quality

    By James Bruggers
    The Courier-Journal

    The Matel family moved from Toronto to Louisville three years ago, arriving during a smoggy August summer.
    At the time, Sandy Metel said, her son Aydin, now 15, had mild asthma. "But within the first year, he was hospitalized five times ... with asthma related issues," she said.
    Welcome to the Louisville area, she said her doctors told them.

  • Gun laws loosen, concealed-carry permits spike

    By Scott Wartman
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    Over the past 10 years, Kentucky has made it easier to carry guns – and statistics show more Kentuckians are carrying concealed firearms than ever before.
    Judging by one of the first few bills filed early for the 2015 session, it doesn’t look like the General Assembly will change direction on guns anytime soon.

  • Federal program will allow Kentucky schools to provide more students with free meals

    By Valarie Honeycutt Spears
    Lexington Herald-Leader

    This fall, all students could receive free meals at some schools in an estimated 100 Kentucky districts, including Fayette, as part of a federal program that has expanded.
    The Community Eligibility Provision, a federal program that started in 2010 as a pilot in Kentucky and other states, will allow schools to provide more students with free meals, no matter their families' incomes.

  • New details released in Raywick murder investigation

    David Litsey Jr. was 22 years old when he died Nov. 9, 2012. He would have turned 24 last week.
    The trial for the man accused of killing him is scheduled for July 14, although the trial has been rescheduled multiple times already.
    Christopher Gribbins, 47, of 821 Dangerfield Road in Hodgenville remains in custody at the Marion County Detention Center, while his trial is pending. Gribbins is the owner of the Raywick Bar and Grill, where Litsey was shot. Litsey later died at Spring View Hospital.

  • Fast times at Cedars of Lebanon Nursing Home

    Cedars of Lebanon Nursing Home residents were recently treated to a visit by Steven Peterson and "LOAD'EM UP Racing." The visit was organized by Communicare Specialized Services staff, who worked with Peterson to bring his racecar to the nursing home on June 6. The residents were quite impressed.

  • Stories Fer Rednecks – Leaving a legacy

    By Matt Overing
    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    Dan and Nick Thompson have seen crazy things happen. They’ve heard about crazy things that have happened. And they’ve written a book about it.
    Dan and Nick have actually written two books: Thompson Family History and Stories Fer Rednecks. Both have crazy stories, but just one tells some of the family history.
    “People have been telling us how much they like them,” Nick said.

  • More time to move

    A divided Marion County Board of Education voted Thursday to give Superintendent Taylora Schlosser an additional 18 months to establish her residency in Marion County.
    By a vote of 3-1, the board approved the change during a special called meeting June 19. Board Chairman DeLane Pinkston and board members Butch Cecil and Mike Cecil voted in favor of amending the superintendent’s contract to grant the extension. Board member Bernard Miles opposed the extension.
    The board’s decision came after an executive session that lasted more than an hour.

  • Finance director staying put

    While the Marion County Board of Education spent most of the public portion of its June 19 meeting addressing the superintendent’s residency, that wasn’t the only issue affecting local schools last week.
    Marion County Public Schools recently learned that they have the potential for a bonding capacity of up to $5.89 million. 
    The report was provided to the district by Mark Rawlings, the vice president of Hilliard and Lyons in Paducah.