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Local News

  • Red Cross blood drive underway until 8 p.m. Aug. 13

    The American Red Cross is reporting it has an urgent need for blood donations.

    A blood drive is taking place until 8 p.m. Aug. 13 at St. Augustine Church in Lebanon.

    More blood drives are scheduled this month:

    • Aug. 17 from 7:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. at Holy Trinity Church, 306 Fredericktown Road in Springfield

    • Aug. 24 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Charles Church, 675 Hwy. 327 in Lebanon

    • Aug. 24 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Dominic School, 309 W. Main Street in Springfield

  • ‘God's got it’

    Aaron Glasscock has served more than 15 years in prison for a crime he said he didn’t commit. He has 11 more years to go, but that could change soon.
    A new federal law took effect earlier this year that could result in Glasscock being released from prison sooner than expected.
    In April, the U.S. Department of Justice announced a new clemency initiative for inmates who met six criteria:
    - They are serving a federal sentence and would likely be serving a shorter sentence if convicted of the same offense today.

  • Knight Time 5K is Saturday

    The Marion County Marching Knights are hosting the Knight Time 5K at 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 16, at Marion County High School.
    This will be a glow run/walk that will be held on the high school campus. This is not a race, and it will not be timed, but every member of the family is welcome to participate. Cost is $20.
    Packet pick-up for this event will take place from 5-7 p.m. Aug. 15 at Marion County High School or starting at 7:30 p.m. the day of the race.
     

  • Council takes on nuisances, panhandling

    Public nuisances and panhandling were two of the main topics discussed at the Lebanon City Council meeting Monday evening.
    The council approved the first reading of an amendment to its property maintenance code to expand the list of conditions deemed to be public nuisances. The council also approved the first reading of an ordinance restricting panhandling.

  • Fiscal court leaves tax rates unchanged

    The Marion County Fiscal Court has approved keeping its tax rates the same as they were last year.
    During their Aug. 7 meeting, the magistrates voted 4-0 to keep the tax rates the same. Magistrate Larry Caldwell was not present during that portion of the meeting, although he did arrive later.
    The fiscal court’s 2014 tax rates are 8.6 cents per $100 in real property and 10.9 cents per $100 in personal property, which include motor vehicles and watercraft.

  • Former prison employees miss ‘family’

    It’s been more than a year since the Commonwealth of Kentucky decided to end its contract with Marion Adjustment Center, a private prison that housed minimum and medium security inmates.
    At the time of the announcement, the prison had more than 160 employees. Some of those employees remained in corrections, but many have had to find employment in other fields.
    “I truly say the people I worked with were like my second family,” said Shawn Gaither, who worked at MAC for 12 years.

  • Local first responders attend private visitation

    By Gina Clear
    The News-Enterprise

    A giant American flag spanned the width of the back wall at Glendale’s Volunteer Fire Department on Saturday as family members and area first responders gathered to pay their respects to fallen firefighter Jonathan French.

  • Gribbins sentenced to 20 years for murder

    Christopher Gribbins has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for the wanton murder of 22-year-old David Litsey Jr.
    Marion Circuit Judge Dan Kelly handed down the sentence Thursday morning.
    Prior to the sentencing, Nicole Stamp, the mother of Litsey’s three children, read a statement on behalf of the Litsey family. She said Nov. 9, 2012, was supposed to be a celebration of the birth of her oldest child, but instead they were mourning Litsey’s death.

  • Kentucky ranks low in Internet speeds

    By Katie Brandenburg
    Bowling Green Daily News

    Kentucky ranked as one of the states with the lowest average Internet connection speeds in the country in the first quarter of 2014, according to a report from the company, Akamai Technologies.
    Kentucky joins Montana and Arkansas with an average connection speed of 7.3 megabits per second, according to the report from the cloud services provider.
    Alaska had the lowest speed of 7 megabits per second, according to the report.

  • Kynect passed by legislative committee

    By Kevin Wheatley
    The State Journal

    Jousting over Gov. Steve Beshear’s decision to enact kynect, the state’s health benefit exchange through the Affordable Care Act, continued Aug. 4 as an interim committee affirmed on a party-line vote an executive order creating the exchange.
    The move prompted the chairwoman of the Senate Health and Welfare Committee to compare Beshear’s actions to those of President Barack Obama, whom she said the governor is “in love with” and “emulates.”