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Local News

  • Biding his time

    March 11 will mark the 15-year anniversary of when Aaron Glasscock woke up to Drug Enforcement Administration agents storming into his hotel room in Gainesville, Fla., and arresting him for conspiracy to distribute cocaine.
    At that very moment, Aaron’s life, and the life of his family, was forever changed.
    “When the D.E.A. agents came in that morning everything I thought I knew, and my life in general, was turned upside down, and then shook,” Aaron wrote in a letter.

  • Honoring the past

    Sunday was a day to honor and remember black history in Marion County.
    Hundreds of people attended the local NAACP’s annual celebration at Centre Square, and then visited the Marion County Heritage Center for the grand opening of its new black history exhibit.
    “This is a great achievement,” said Ann Simpson, treasurer of the local NAACP chapter. “I think it’ll be more prosperous as it goes along.”

  • Fiscal court supports kids fishing program

    The Marion County Sheriff’s Office turned in $65,000 in excess fees to the Marion County Fiscal Court last week, but the court gave away some money as well.
    Jason Spalding appeared before the Marion County Fiscal Court on Feb. 20 seeking assistance for the Fishing for Kids program. Spalding told the magistrates that the program has attracted hundreds of children from in and around Marion County, but this year they lost one of their sponsors. The court encouraged Spalding to find an organization to oversee the event and to put some fund-raisers in effect for next year.

  • Send us your PROMposals

    As April draws closer, more Marion County High School students are popping the question... “Prom?”
    And, what used to be a simple question has grown to an elaborate and creative undertaking.
    We want to hear about this year’s best “Promposals.”
    If you went above the bar to ask your date to prom, we want to hear about it. Email details of your “Promposal” and a photo to Stevie Lowery at editor@lebanonenterprise.com.

  • Tourist commission approves $2,000 for concert marketing

    Robin Humphress visited the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission during its Feb. 17 meeting seeking $5,500 for a concert planned for Sept. 6.
    Humphress of Kentucky Classic Arts is trying to bring The Bretts to Lebanon. The Bretts are a family of singers, songwriters and performers based in Branson, Mo.
    According to Humphress’s application, they are planning to sell tickets for $20 apiece. The $5,500 request was to help cover the performers’ fee and help with marketing.

  • Addicted newborns increasing in Kentucky, new report says

    By Laura Ungar
    The Courier-Journal

    Hospitalizations for Kentucky babies born dependent on drugs because of their mothers’ addictions are continuing to rise steeply even as drug overdose deaths level off, a new University of Kentucky report says.

  • PSC calls on utilities to work with customers facing big bills

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – The Kentucky Public Service Commission has called on the state’s electric and natural gas utilities to work with customers who are having difficulty paying extremely large heating bills in the wake of extremely cold weather this winter.
    In a letter sent to the chief executives of the utilities, the PSC asks that utilities “be as flexible as possible…in avoiding disconnections and in allowing customers to make arrangements to extend their payments.

  • Bluegrass Pipeline to be delayed a year

    By Ryan Quinn
    The State Journal

    The Feb. 19 announcement that the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline will be delayed a year is a victory in “round one” for Kentuckians, a leading opponent to the project said.
    Chris Schimmoeller, president of Envision Franklin County, said the company’s decision gives respite to landowners.
    “I look forward to solving some of these issues without the pipeline breathing down our necks,” Schimmoeller said.

  • Key bills moving slowly in Kentucky legislature

    By Mike Wynn
    The Courier-Journal

    FRANKFORT, KY. — With less than 30 meeting days remaining in Kentucky‘s 2014 General Assembly, only two of the more than 570 proposed bills have been signed into law: one sets a deadline for creating voter precincts and the second expands prescribing power for nurses.
    Left hanging are numerous high-profile proposals on tax reform, gambling, heroin abuse, minimum wage and the use of eminent domain to build the Bluegrass Pipeline — with most moving at a glacial pace, if at all.

  • Bill would make life without parole minimum penalty for killing a cop

    By Randy Patrick
    The Kentucky Standard

    Rep. David Floyd, R-Bardstown, has filed a bill in the state legislature that would make the minimum penalty for killing a peace officer life without parole.
    House Bill 368, if it becomes law, would be named The Officer Jason Ellis Memorial Act in honor of the 33-year-old Bardstown police officer who was ambushed and murdered last May on the Bluegrass Parkway on his way home from work.