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Local News

  • A grocer and a giver

    Getting Donnie Miles to slow down for a few minutes for an interview is no easy task.
    You might catch him early in the morning. He opens his grocery store, Loretto Foodland, at 7 a.m.
    But, get there early, talk fast and expect several interruptions. He’s a busy man. And his customers come first.
    Within minutes of walking into his store bright and early last week, Miles was busy waiting on customers, answering phone calls and lending some gas money to a friend.

  • Farmers, Scholars

    Siblings Eric and Lauren Farmer are guaranteed to have something many college graduates are still hoping to get — jobs after they finish their degrees.
    Not too bad considering Eric, 20, is a sophomore at the University of Kentucky, and Lauren, 18, is still a senior at Marion County High School.

  • Inaugural Green Festival coming this month

    By John Overby
    Landmark News Service

    “Local products, local food, local fun!”
    That is the tagline for the first-ever Springfield Green Festival, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday, April 26, along Depot Street (the road where the new farmers market is located).
    Organized by the New Pioneers for a Sustainable Future, the event will, in part, focus on teaching the local population about how it can help the environment and how it can be fiscally beneficial for someone to “go green.”

  • LMS hires new leader

    Becoming principal at Lebanon Middle School was not part of Christina McRay’s plan when she began serving as its interim principal in January.
    In fact, she was apprehensive about serving as interim.
    “My whole entire career was in high school,” McRay said. “That was my gig. That was my comfort zone.”

  • Tonya Ford loses appeal in murder case

    She has lost a chance at freedom, and could spend 15 more years in prison before getting another one.
    Campbellsville resident Tonya Ford, 40, was found guilty of shooting and killing her husband, Lebanon Police Officer David Ford, in August of 2012. A month later, she was sentenced to serve 20 years in prison for her crimes.

  • Two seek to challenge Whitfield for Congressional seat

    Republican Congressman Ed Whitfield has represented Kentucky’s First District since 1994.
    In 2012, Marion County and a sliver of Washington County were added to that district, but two Democrats are hoping 2014 will bring another change.
    Wesley Bolin, 25, and Charles Hatchett, 62, may be part of opposite ends of the generational divide, but they are united in seeking to unseat Whitfield in November.
    Both see themselves as quite different than the incumbent Congressman.

  • Beshear undecided on special session on heroin

    By Mike Wynn
    The Courier-Journal

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – Hours after an effort to stem heroin abuse died in the Kentucky legislature, Gov. Steve Beshear said April 16 that he hasn’t decided whether to call a special session to resurrect the bill.
    Proposals to combat heroin with tougher penalties for dealers and more money for treatment languished on the House floor on the night of April 15 as lawmakers debated smaller bills and ran short on time. But supporters say the issue is too important to wait until 2015.

  • Guard against phishing in wake of Heartbleed Bug

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – With reports of the Heartbleed bug spreading like wildfire, it’s important to stay vigilant against potential scams.
    The Kentucky Department of Financial Institutions is warning consumers about possible phishing attempts in the wake of the Heartbleed bug – a critical security vulnerability that has put many systems at risk.

  • Mid-Continent classes still meet despite decision to close

    By Kathleen Fox
    The Paducah Sun

    MAYFIELD - One day after Mid-Continent University announced full layoffs and a closure date at the end of June, students, faculty and staff members worked to salvage what’s left of the more than 60-year-old college.

  • State's snow, ice costs climb to $68 million this winter

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – A winter season punctuated by a polar vortex, sub-zero temperatures, and nasty snow and crippling ice storms created more than a traveling nuisance for Kentucky residents. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet spent more than $68 million on snow and ice removal – about 1 1/2 times the cost of a typical Kentucky winter.