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Local News

  • Animal officers seeking information about dead dog

    Marion County’s animal control officers are seeking information about a pit bull that was found dead on the side of Josh Cox Road on Friday.
    Sarah Gribbins of the animal shelter said they received a call around 2 p.m. Friday from a property owner in the area. He noticed the dog. He also saw a gas can with some gasoline still inside about three feet from the dog.
    “It almost looks like they tried to catch the dog on fire,” Gribbins said.
    She added that fur appeared to have been burned off on the dog.

  • Garbage stink is finally aired out

    Collecting garbage is a dirty job, and since 1994, it’s caused a real stink between the Marion County Fiscal Court and the owner of Brookhaven Trailer Park.
    The county and Brookhaven Manor, Inc., have been in a legal battle since 1995, which finally came to a resolution recently.
    The legal battle began in July of 1994, when Paul Howard Jr., Brookhaven trailer park operator, stopped paying garbage collection bills after his payments were modified when Marion County Judge/Executive Dave Hourigan took office.

  • Flooding concerns shared with council

    Downtown business and property owners filled Lebanon City Hall Monday evening to air their concerns about flood water.
    Charles Mills of Chasers was the first person to address the council about recent downtown flooding.
    "I'm not here to raise hell. I ain't here to complain,” Mills said. He added they were there to help the city solve the problem.
    He recounted how the basement of his restaurant flooded as a result of heavy rainfall and how splashing water from passing cars created additional problems.

  • Ed Whitfield talks diabetes, the economy and energy at chamber luncheon

    U.S. Congressman Ed Whitfield spoke on a variety of topics at the Marion County Chamber of Commerce luncheon Wednesday, including the fight against diabetes, the economy and the energy sector.
    Representatives from the American Diabetes Association were on hand to present Whitfield with an award for his work to help in the fight against diabetes. While Whitfield said no one in his family has ever had diabetes, it’s a cause that is near and dear to his heart after meeting a group of children in Paducah, ages 10 to 14, who all had the disease.

  • Bluegrass Pipeline officials, opponents address legislators

    By Ryan Quinn
    The State Journal

    A legislative committee meeting drew about 150 people Thursday for a discussion on the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline, which could make its way through Kentucky.
    Controversy has arisen over the safety and environmental risks of the project and the question of whether the pipeline companies have eminent domain to secure easements from landowners. All these issues came up Thursday, with lawmakers expressing both support and concern.

  • Kroger to end double coupons in Kentucky

    From The State Journal

    Kroger announced Friday it will cease doubling coupon values Sept. 22 in most of its Kentucky, southern Indiana and southern Illinois stores.
    Local Kroger stores are not alone in the change; The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that coupon doubling would end Sept. 21 in Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama stores. There’s even a Facebook page called “Bring Back Doubles” and a website, www.bringbackdoubles.com, with the titular goal of urging Kroger to reverse the trend.

  • Kroger car show

    On Saturday, Kroger held a car show, which benefitted the Make-A-Wish Foundation. The show featured classic vehicles, each of which had a story to tell. The Marion County Cattleman?s Association served up ribeye sandwiches, hamburgers and more during the show.
     

  • TG Kentucky to plant 35,000 trees

    If you’ve driven past TG Kentucky in Lebanon lately, it looks as if the company is building a moat.
    But, they’re not.
    They are actually prepping the land surrounding the factory for an afforestation project, scheduled to be completed in March of 2014.
    Afforestation is a fancy word for planting a bunch of trees… 35,000, in fact.
    According to a press release from TG Kentucky, on March 23, 2014, the company will plant 35,000 trees on the land surrounding its facility.

  • Where are they now?

    Michael Lanham’s resume could be considered legendary.
    He graduated from Marion County High School when he was only 14 years old.
    At 15, he began pursuing his education at Centre College in Danville, majoring in music and math.
    At 18, he became the youngest person (that we know of) to be named a Rhodes Scholar.
    At 19, he graduated from Centre College, and then spent the next three years studying at Oxford University in England.

  • Driving Under the Influence - The Drivers

    This is the second story in a series about drinking and driving. This story focuses on the people who choose to drink and drive.

    Samantha Worthy, 32, of Fulton County hasn’t seen her two little boys since May.
    Her mother passed away in July, and she wasn’t there to say goodbye.
    Her father is extremely ill in a nursing home, and she’s afraid she might miss his final breaths, too, as she sits behind a jail cell in the Marion County Detention Center.