Local News

  • Generous and gentle

    Wes Daugherty was a successful businessman, owning and operating a local grocery for decades and as one of a group of local investors who purchased Citizens National Bank in 1983.

  • Marching Knights reach semifinals

    The Marion County High School Marching Knights finished sixth in the AAAA East Regional competition Oct. 20 in Berea. As a result the Marching Knights will advance to the AAAA semifinals Oct. 27 at Barren County High School.

    Marion County received a score of 79.15 in the semifinals. Anderson County won the regional competition with 88.925 points.

    The times and order for the semifinals have not yet been announced.

  • Fire school will be held Oct. 27-28

    Firefighters from all over Kentucky will arrive in Lebanon this weekend for the sixth annual Marion County Fire School.

    The school will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27, and Sunday, Oct. 28 at various locations. Classes will include fire behavior and control, firefighter survival, arson/crime scene management and drivers training.

    Live training exercises will include safety, fire behavior, using portable extinguishers, ladders, fire hoses and appliances, water supply, ventilation and forcible entry.

  • New Harmonies events continue this week with multiple free events

    Four events are scheduled over the next seven days to coincide with the New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music Exhibit.

    Thursday, Oct. 25, the Friends of the Library and the Kentucky Humanities Council are sponsoring a Chautauqua event at 7 p.m. at the Centre Square Fine Arts Building in Lebanon. This event is free, although donations will be accepted.

  • Art show and reception Thursday at the judicial center

    The Marion County Judicial Center will be hosting an arts reception from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25.  The reception is free and open to the public.

    The reception will showcase a variety of paintings on display at the judicial center. A number of Kentucky artists, including several from Marion County, have pieces on display.

    Much of the artwork was created specifically for the judicial center. The reception will include music and light refreshments.

  • Magistrates approve community requests

    The Marion County Fiscal Court on Oct. 18 approved requests for assistance for Loretto Head Start and the Generation Gap's Toys for Kids program.

    The magistrates voted unanimously to give $12,000 toward improvements to the playground for Loretto Head Start.

    The judge and the magistrates agreed to contribute $1,500 combined to the Generation Gap's annual Christmas toy give-away. Junior Adams estimated that 175 to 200 children received toys last year through the program.

  • Mayor named elected official of the year

    Gary Crenshaw has served as the mayor of Lebanon since 1999, winning re-election more than once, and recently his efforts during the past 13 years were recognized by the Kentucky League of Cities.

    On Oct. 12, Crenshaw was named the Elected Official of the Year by the KLC during its annual conference in Lexington.

    "I was very humbled by that," Crenshaw said. "I certainly wasn't expecting it."

  • Hours to be cut at Gravel Switch Post Office

    Around 20 people attended last week's meeting to learn what changes would be coming to the Gravel Switch Post Office.

    Starting in January, the window at the Gravel Switch office will be open four hours a day, from 11:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Monday through Friday. Saturday hours will remain the same, from 7:45 a.m. to 10:45.

    "I don't like doing this anymore than anybody else," said Tommy Adkins, a manager of post office operations out of Lexington.

  • Halloween in the Park is Oct. 31

    Halloween in the Park will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 31, at Graham Memorial Park.

    Trick-or-treating will take place in the City of Lebanon from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31.

  • Haunted Forest keeps growing, changing

    Five years ago, the children of Eugene Hourigan were talking about what they could do for Halloween. They discussed making a haunted forest in the land around Eugene's home, and they eventually decided if they were going to do it, they might as well open it for the public, too.

    "It's one time a year," said Joyce Hourigan Taylor. "We get together. We have fun. We scare each other."