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Local News

  • Stolen identity

    Margaret Brockman, 68, leads a simple life.

      She and her husband of almost 49 years, Paul, live in a modest home in Lebanon.

      When they aren't visiting with their four children and numerous grandchildren, Brockman likes to sew, garden and go on walks.

      But, according to the World Wide Web, Brockman leads a very different life and has had an affair, lent her boyfriend $750,000 and is a "confirmed fraud."

  • Jail inmate charged with escape, says he lost his glasses

    An 68-year-old inmate who was doing community service work is facing a second-degree escape charge after getting separated from his work group, according to the Marion County Detention Center.

    James W. Bailey was part of a community service crew that was picking up trash along Gene Hunt Road on Wednesday, June 26. Around 12:45 p.m., when the crew reached the bottom of a hill, the MCDC deputy in charge of the crew noticed that one inmate was missing.

  • MAC gets 30-day contract extension

    Marion Adjustment Center has received a 30-day contract extension from the Department of Corrections.

    Jennifer Brislin, communications director for the Cabinet for Justice and Public Safety, confirmed that the temporary extension has been accepted by both the state and the prison.

    That means the contract will not end Sunday with the end of the fiscal year, but rather on July 30.


    Local push to save prison

  • City approves 2013-14 budget

    The Lebanon City Council voted 5-0 to approve both the second reading of the 2013-14 budget and the second reading of the 2012-13 budget during a special-called meeting June 20. Councilman Jay Grundy was not present at the meeting.
    The 2013-14 budget includes nearly $8.6 million in total resources, including $6.4 million in new revenue. This is a decrease compared to the $8.86 million in resources the city had during the 2012-13 fiscal year.
    Both budgets are considered official with their publication in today’s Enterprise.

  • Upcoming early deadlines for Enterprise

    The Lebanon Enterprise will have early deadlines for its July 3 edition. Due to our printing schedule, the deadline for all advertising will be noon on Friday, June 28. All editorial items for the sports section will need to be submitted by noon on Friday, as well.
    The Twin County Advantage will also have early deadlines for its July 8 issue. The deadline for all advertising will be noon on Tuesday, July 2.

  • Marion County Fair begins June 29

    The Marion County Fair returns Saturday, June 29, and continues through Saturday July 6 at the Marion County Fairgrounds.
    The carnival and two new features — Laser Tag and Nojoe’s Circus — will be available every evening from July 1 through July 6. The carnival opens at 6 p.m. nightly, and Laser Tag will be available all evening.
    Nojoe’s Circus will give two performances per night. The circus will include clowns, trampoline and trapeze artists, the Dynamo Dogs and much more.

  • ‘Oklahoma!’ to benefit tornado victims

    Kentucky Classic Theatre is producing Roger’s and Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!” in July, and a portion of the proceeds will benefit victims of the recent tornadoes in Oklahoma.
    “This is a great opportunity to support your local arts community as well as help another hurting community. We are proud to be a part of that,” said Robin Humphress of Kentucky Classic Theatre.
    The performances will be at 7 p.m. July 18 and 19 and 8 p.m. July 20. Tickets for all shows are $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under.

  • County gives up control of old courthouse

    When the Marion County Judicial Center opened in the fall of 2011, the old Marion County Courthouse sat vacant until the Marion County Historical Society moved into the top floor in July of 2012.
    The historical society opened the Marion County Heritage Center inside the old courthouse last September, although the grand opening took place this past February.
    Thursday, the historical society members returned to the Marion County Fiscal Court seeking control over the entire building.

  • Heritage Center commemorates the Civil War with music, displays

    The Marion County Heritage Center will be remembering Lebanon’s connections to the Civil War in a series of activities in July.
    Starting July 1, the heritage center will have a new exhibit on loan from the Kentucky Historical Society. The exhibit features several banners with information about the Civil War and President Abraham Lincoln.
    Members of the Marion County Historical Society also hope to have some local memorabilia from that period.

  • Industrial Foundation will be taxed this year

    The Marion County Industrial Foundation will be getting a property tax bill for the first time this year.
    “We’ve been tax exempt,” said Tom Lund, Marion County Economic Development Director, in a phone interview.
    That changed following a Kentucky Supreme Court decision earlier this year in a case that originated in eastern Kentucky. In that decision, the court ruled that industrial foundations are not tax exempt.