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Local News

  • Fiscal court meets Aug. 15

    The Marion County Fiscal Court is scheduled to meet in regular session at 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15, on the second floor of the David R. Hourigan Building.

    The agenda for Thursday's meeting includes the following items:

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Humana presentation on the impact of the Affordable Care Act on insurance plans

    - Resolution/agreement on use of state flex funds for county roads

    - Economic development roadways projects (Village Way, Maker's Mark Road)

  • Leadership Lebanon applications are being accepted

    Applications for Leadership Lebanon-Marion County are now available. If you are interested in becoming a candidate or would like to refer someone for the class, please contact Liz Lawson at Kentucky Cooperage (270) 692-4674, or Lisa Richardson at (270) 692-2121.
    Applications are available at Kentucky Cooperage. Completed applications should be turned in no later that Aug. 19.

  • Principal search underway at MCHS

    The Marion County School-Based Decision Making Council met Aug. 5 and began the process of selecting its next principal.
    Lynne Keene, representative from the Kentucky Association of School Councils, attended the meeting to lead principal selection training.

  • E911 committee gets update on progress

    Marion County is working toward acquiring enhanced 911 services at a time that will allow the county to take advantage of cost-saving technology.
    Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly discussed the county’s progress during the Lebanon/Marion County E911 Advisory Committee meeting on Aug. 7. The meeting included state and local officials and representatives from the Lincoln Trail Area Development District and Mapsync.

  • Electric fires damage homes in Lebanon, Loretto

    A pair of Marion County homes were damaged as a result of electrical fires last week on North Spalding Avenue in Lebanon and Spencer Hamilton Road in Loretto.
    No people were injured in either fire, but a pet cat did die in the fire on North Spalding Avenue.

    North Spalding fire
    A house belonging to a local teacher and a former Enterprise and Springfield Sun reporter was damaged by a fire Aug. 9.

  • 'Inspired Hope' for families suffering with Huntington's

    By Brandon Mattingly
    Landmark News Service

    Donna Mattingly of Cox's Creek and her family have faced a struggle for the last 20 years that many of us could never imagine, much less manage on a day-to-day basis.
    Complications with Huntington's Disease have taken the lives of her first husband, Jimmy Ruley, their son, Cory, and others in the family since 1990.

  • MAC employees optimistic amid job search

    Mark A. Mays was one of several Marion Adjustment Center employees who attended a job fair Aug. 8 at the David R. Hourigan Government Building.
    In late June, MAC employees learned that the state does not plan to continue housing inmates at the private prison in St. Mary. Since then, the inmate population has been reduced from more than 800 inmates to fewer than 400 as of Monday, according to the Kentucky Department of Corrections data.

  • Singing nuns state their opposition to pipeline project

    In the center of an Aug. 8 open house about the Bluegrass Pipeline, a group of women started singing “Amazing Grace.” The women, all members of the Loretto Community, continued to sing until a representative of the companies, accompanied by an Elizabethtown police officer, asked them to stop.
    The Sisters of Loretto and their co-members carried signs encouraging people to say no to the pipeline during the open house at the Pritchard Community Center in Elizabethtown.

  • School tax could go up

    Thursday, Aug. 29, a public tax hearing will be held at the Marion County Board of Education office and it’s likely the board will approve a 4 percent increase to the current tax rate.
    Last year, former Superintendent Dr. Chuck Hamilton recommended and the board voted to increase the real estate and personal property taxes by only 1.1 percent, while most other surrounding school boards voted to increase the rate by the maximum percentage, which is 4 percent. Hamilton said he was trying to be sensitive to local families in the community.

  • What MCPS teachers think of their schools

    Teachers in Marion County and across the state had the opportunity to make their opinions known on various school issues by completing to the TELL (Teaching, Empowering, Leading and Learning) Kentucky survey this past spring.
    Locally, 85 percent of the certified staff in Marion County filled out the anonymous online questionnaire, and the results have been eye opening for district administrators and Marion County Superintendent Taylora Schlosser.