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Local News

  • Nurse practitioners gain more autonomy

    Nurse practitioners have more authority to help their patients since Senate Bill 7 was signed into law Feb. 13. Specifically, SB 7 grants nurse practitioners greater autonomy to prescribe medicine for their patients.
    And that’s important, according to Judy Kantlehner, who has been a nurse practitioner for 20 years and, as far as she is aware, was the first one in Marion County.
    “You can’t very well care for your patients without being able to prescribe medicine,” Kantlehner said.

  • Getting involved, staying active

    Kandice Engle-Gray joined the Marion County Chamber of Commerce in 2002 thinking it would help her and her law practice.
    “Originally, I thought it would be a great way for me to meet the other business owners in the community and other people in the community,” she said.
    The next year she was asked to join the chamber’s board of directors. She agreed to do so, although she admits she didn’t really know what she was getting into at the time.

  • Nelson County family accuses pipeline reps of trespassing

    Frances Strange and her husband, Larry, consider themselves “distraught landowners” who live along the proposed route for the Bluegrass Pipeline.
    At least that’s how they described themselves in a letter to the editor sent to the Enterprise.
    The Stranges live on Loretto Road in Nelson County, but they aren’t far from the Marion County line.
    “We actually have Marion County water,” Frances Strange said.

  • Knight STRONG

    On Feb 26, Marion County High School held a memorial for Jeffrey Tanner Strong. Strong, 16, died Feb. 19 when he and a friend were tearing down a tree house. Strong was remembered by his church, family, and peers from MCHS. Strong’s classmates have shown their love and admiration for him in many ways since his death. Strong was an avid UK fan, and his friends honored him by wearing blue shirts in the days after his death. During the memorial service, students donned their UK gear, read memories about Strong, walked a lap around the track and released blue and white balloons.

  • Judicial center, library are closed today

    The Marion County Judicial Center and the Marion County Public Library will be closed today, Monday, March 3.

    Marion County Circuit Clerk Kim May said all cases that were scheduled for today have been reset for 9 a.m. Friday, March 7.

    The library announced on its Facebook page that it will be closed due to the poor driving conditions throughout the county and slick condition of the library's parking lot. The library will delete any overdue fines that may result from the closure.

  • Marion County schools will be open on a one-hour delay Thursday

    Marion County Schools will be open Thursday, March 6, on one-hour delay, according to Superintendent Taylora Schlosser.

    Marion County schools also will be using the Plan B bus routes, but there will be no preschool Thursday.

    Plan B routes can be found here http://marion.kyschools.us/docs/district/depts/16/2013-14%20school%20year%20plan%20b%20route.pdf.

  • Honoring Tanner Strong

    On Tuesday, Feb 26, Marion County High School held a memorial for Jeffrey Tanner Strong. Strong, who died in an accident last week, was remembered by his church, family and peers from MCHS. After students read their memories about Strong, they walked a lap around the track and had a balloon release.

    See more photos in next week's edition of The Lebanon Enterprise.
     

  • Biding his time

    March 11 will mark the 15-year anniversary of when Aaron Glasscock woke up to Drug Enforcement Administration agents storming into his hotel room in Gainesville, Fla., and arresting him for conspiracy to distribute cocaine.
    At that very moment, Aaron’s life, and the life of his family, was forever changed.
    “When the D.E.A. agents came in that morning everything I thought I knew, and my life in general, was turned upside down, and then shook,” Aaron wrote in a letter.

  • Honoring the past

    Sunday was a day to honor and remember black history in Marion County.
    Hundreds of people attended the local NAACP’s annual celebration at Centre Square, and then visited the Marion County Heritage Center for the grand opening of its new black history exhibit.
    “This is a great achievement,” said Ann Simpson, treasurer of the local NAACP chapter. “I think it’ll be more prosperous as it goes along.”

  • Fiscal court supports kids fishing program

    The Marion County Sheriff’s Office turned in $65,000 in excess fees to the Marion County Fiscal Court last week, but the court gave away some money as well.
    Jason Spalding appeared before the Marion County Fiscal Court on Feb. 20 seeking assistance for the Fishing for Kids program. Spalding told the magistrates that the program has attracted hundreds of children from in and around Marion County, but this year they lost one of their sponsors. The court encouraged Spalding to find an organization to oversee the event and to put some fund-raisers in effect for next year.