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Local News

  • Special-called fiscal court meeting Saturday

    The Marion County Fiscal Court has scheduled a special-called meeting for 8 a.m. Saturday, March 5, at the David R. Hourigan Government Building.

    The court has two items on its agenda. The first is a E-911 considerations, and the second is the county's administrative code/personnel policy handbook, which is being revised.

  • Minority parent needed for Superintendent Search Screening Committee

    The Marion County Public School System is in need of a minority parent to be on the Superintendent Search Screening Committee.

    So far, the committee consists of the following individuals:

    - Ed Hacker – board representative

    - Brad Mattingly – parent representative

    - Marilu Farnham - teacher representative (Glasscock Elementary School)

    - Hollie Buckman – teacher representative (Lebanon Middle School)

  • Fiscal court meeting at 4 p.m. March 3

    The Marion County Fiscal Court will meet at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 3, in regular session at the David R. Hourigan Government Building.

    Items on the agenda include:

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Rural and secondary road report/proposal for 2011- District  4  Hwy. personnel

    - Consider renewal of county employee  Delta Denta plan

    - Request for funding  -  Marion County High School annual “Project Graduation”

  • Ford murder case on track

    Instructions will soon be prepared for a jury to use while deciding whether Tonya Ford killed her husband in 2009.

    Ford was in court again Tuesday of last week for a pretrial conference in the case that accuses her of murdering her husband. The hearing, before Taylor Circuit Court Judge Dan Kelly, lasted about five minutes.

    Ford, 37, is accused of killing her husband, former Lebanon Police officer David M. Ford on Feb. 10, 2009. She pleaded not guilty in November.

  • 'Just good farmers'

    J.W. Maupin. 78, remembers using mules to work fields and selling tobacco for 50 cents per pound. His son Mike, 56, is continuing the farming tradition, although he's always used tractors. Together they raise corn, soybeans, tobacco and beef cattle on hundreds of acres of land.

    And together they have been recognized for their years of dedication as the Marion County Chamber of Commerce's Outstanding Farmers.

    Mike said winning the award was an honor.

  • Councilman pleads guilty to alcohol intoxication

    Last week, Lebanon City Councilman Gerald C. "Jerry" Abell pled guilty to a charge of alcohol intoxication stemming from an incident that occurred Nov. 27.

    Abell, 52, of 728 Doctor Street in Lebanon was ordered by District Judge Connie Phillips to pay $130 court costs, $25 fine, $25 bond filing fee, $2.50 attorney tax and $.50 law library fee, for a total of $183.

  • Heart of Kentucky Antique and Craft Fair is March 5-6

    Antique and craft dealers will come from all over the state and beyond to create a shopping and viewing delight Saturday, March 5, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, March 6, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Lebanon.

    The show is set in the Convention Complex at Centre Square. All the bases are covered from baskets to Amish baskets, birdhouses, pottery and floral displays to jewelry, art photography, soaps and natural art.

  • A challenge to succeed

    Donald Smith returned to Marion County Sunday, and he issued a challenge to the community.

    "It's time that you take control of your own destiny," he said.

    To do that, he said people need to stop listening to the wrong voices, to act based on where they are going, and to find a purpose for their lives.

  • St. Francis man receives probation for cruelty to animals

    Richard Niles, 70, of 580 St. Francis Road in St. Francis pled guilty to second-degree cruelty to animals Monday of last week after being accused of shooting one of his neighbor's dogs.

    He was sentenced to 60 days in jail, but that was probated for 24 months on the condition that there be no further problems.

    He was ordered to pay $112.31 in restitution.

    Niles originally pleaded not guilty to the charges in January.

  • Leave-ing Lebanon

    Many tobacco farmers will have a new destination when they take their tobacco to market later this year - Danville.

    Phillip Morris USA has had a receiving station at the Tobacco Services, Inc., warehouse in Lebanon for years, but the company's contract growers will take their leaves to Danville instead. Ken Garcia, a spokesperson for Phillip Morris USA, said local farmers were informed of the decision during a recent meeting of tobacco growers.