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Local News

  • Cream of the Crop

    In the eyes of Kentucky Farm Bureau, Marion County is the "Top County" in the state.

    The Top County award has been presented for nearly four decades, and the 2011 prize was given to the Marion County chapter during the annual state convention in December in Louisville.

    "All 120 counties in the state have county Farm Bureaus. That obviously makes the competition a little stiffer," said Dan Smaldone, director of public relations for Kentucky Farm Bureau.

  • Industrial Foundation sets 2012 priorities

    The Marion County Industrial Foundation will be marketing a 100,000-square-foot building, trying to recruit a food processing company and encouraging a change to the oversight of local technical education during the coming year.

    These were three of the foundation's goals discussed during its annual retreat Friday afternoon in the Marion County Economic Development Office.

  • Hunger for education

    In the crowded lunchrooms of Marion County's schools, there's a quiet but telling sign that the economy is taking a toll on local families.

    Sixty percent of students are signed up for free or reduced lunches, a record high for the district.

    That number is even higher for two of the district's elementary schools, Glasscock and Lebanon Elementary, which both have a 75 percent free and reduced lunch population.

  • New tourism director is hired

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission has hired a new executive director.

    Nicky Reynolds of Oak Ridge, Tenn., has accepted the position, and the commission voted Monday evening to approve hiring Reynolds.

    The commissioners who were there voted unanimously in favor of the hire. Commissioner Dennis George had to leave the meeting prior to the vote due to another appointment.

  • Board sets final deadline for demolition of Spragens' property

    After missing two deadlines to demolish his property located at 322 S. Proctor Knott Avenue in Lebanon, Frank Spragens has a final deadline of Jan. 25 to have the demolition complete. If not, the City of Lebanon will do it for him.

  • New tourism director has been hired

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission has hired a new executive director.
    Nicky Reynolds of Oak Ridge, Tenn., has accepted the position, and the commission voted Monday evening to approve hiring Reynolds.
    The commissioners who were there voted unanimously in favor of the hire. Commissioner Dennis George had to leave the meeting prior to the vote due to another appointment.
    In a phone interview Monday evening, Reynolds, 33, said she has had a good experience in her interaction with the commission.

  • School board to meet Jan. 10

    The Marion County Board of Education is scheduled to meet in regular session at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 10, at the board office, 755 E. Main Street in Lebanon.

    The agenda is as follows:

    - Board member recognition

    - Proclamation by County Judge Executive John G. Mattingly 

    - T.J. Poliskie, school energy manager regarding Energy Star status for district schools

    - Superintendent's report

  • Tourist commission to meet Jan. 9

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission is scheduled to meet in regular session at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, in room 300 at the Centre Square Convention Center.

    The agenda for the meeting includes the following items:

    - Kandice Engle-Gray to discuss the lease agreement with the City of Lebanon

    - Don Johnson regarding the Kentucky Baroque Trumpets

    - Suzi O'Daniel regarding the Heart of Kentucky Antique and Craft Show

  • Lebanon City Council meets Monday, Jan. 9

    The Lebanon City Council is scheduled to meet in regular session at 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 9, at city hall, 118 S. Proctor Knott Avenue.

    The agenda is as follows:

    - Delegation from the United Concerned Citizens regarding the Dr. Martin Luther King March.

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Payment of bills

    - Reports

    - Old business

  • Writer's high

    When Jim Higdon III was a student at Columbia University, he met a lot of intellectuals who he said could not find Kentucky on a map, yet they were entertained by the stories he shared from Marion County.

    "I realized at some point there was a currency in the stories from here, that we had the market cornered on awesome stories," Higdon said.