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Local News

  • Little libraries all over Lebanon

    Looking for something new to read? Now there’s an opportunity to pick up a new book just about anywhere you go in Lebanon. In an effort to promote reading and literacy, Joy Global has teamed up with Little Free Library to set up the small stands throughout the city.
    The way it works is if you see a library, take a look at the selection. If you see something you like, take it and read it. When you’re finished with the book, you can either let someone else borrow it, or return it to a Little Free Library. You can even leave other books there as well.

  • For the love of cooking

    The stress of being a chef in a restaurant can be overwhelming. The stress of managing a restaurant can also be overwhelming. Doing both at the same time? Some might tell you it’s insanity. But really, it just takes a special kind of person to do both. For Shiner’s Restaurant, that person is Joe Parks.
    His love of food came about when he was just a small child.

  • From Fiji with love

    Nicole Suniula looked down at her old Bible. It had been around the world with her for many trips and throughout many years. It was held loosely together by duct tape. Some of the pages from Revelation were missing. But there was a short, hand-written note in the front. She’d written it more than 15 years ago. It read: “The world is waiting for me, I responded to His call, Feb. 24, 2001.”

  • Let’s go to the movies

    East Main Dairy Freeze is headed to the big screen.
    From closing off traffic, to taking up the entire parking lot, crews from the movie, “What Lies Ahead,” were eager to use the location for a scene of the upcoming movie.
    Starring Rumer Willis and Emma Dumont, the movie is a thriller that has been mostly filmed in Bardstown.
    Director Rob Gardner said finding the right locations for the movie was key to making it feel authentic.

  • Playin with dedication
  • Zoning board tables decision

    The Rev. Bill Bowling stared down a large crowd of people, but this wasn’t his usual congregation. Without enough chairs, Lebanon City Hall was packed to the walls with citizens wanting to see what the Board of Zoning Adjustments would decide. Would they allow the house at 150 E. Main St. to become a transitional home or would they deny it?

  • Loretto working to fix sewer problems

    The City of Loretto wants to do everything it can to avoid increasing its sewer rates, but that’s going to require some cooperation from its residents.
    Approximately 30 residents attended Thursday’s Loretto City Council meeting to discuss the city’s sewer issues.
    “The goal is to not raise the sewer rates, and it’s getting very close to doing that,” Loretto Mayor Tom Brahm said.

  • Making small deposits

    It’s zero degrees outside but that doesn’t keep Dallas Robinson from sweating. Steam rolls off his body and his heart pounds as he stands ready to push the bobsled into motion with his other teammates. He knows he could die. It’s happened to other athletes in the past. After all, he’s about to get on a sled that will reach up to 95 miles per hour and he’s wearing limited protective gear. He could be ejected. The sled could flip over. But all he’s thinking about is the push.

  • Fiscal court helps honor guard get a new ride

    The Marion County Veterans Honor Guard is getting some much-needed financial assistance from the Marion County Fiscal Court to purchase a new bus.
    Paul Powell, a member of the honor guard, addressed the court during its regular monthly meeting Aug. 18. He informed the court that the honor guard has been using their current bus, which is a 1997 model, since 2004. It has more than 217,000 miles on it.
    “It’s in bad shape. We need help,” Powell said.

  • Arena could cost $25 million

    It’s back to the drawing board for those in charge of planning the new multipurpose facility.
    The Multipurpose Facility Committee met on Aug. 15 to discuss the potential blueprints of the facility with engineers, but was slammed with a much larger price tag than previously anticipated. Before, the committee had estimated the cost to be around $4 million, but in their most recent meeting, engineers from CFW Associated Engineers Inc. said the cost could go as high as $25 million.