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Local News

  • MCAHC to host event for Black History Month

    “Chains Are Falling” is the theme of this year’s annual Black History Month event sponsored by the Marion County Arts and Humanities Council. It will be held at 4 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 6, at the Lebanon United Presbyterian Church in Lebanon. 
     

  • Kentucky Bluegrass Music Kickoff is Jan. 22-23

    The Kentucky Bluegrass Music Kickoff will take place Jan. 22-23 inside the Roby Dome at Marion County High School. This year’s headlining act is Seldom Scene, which has been playing bluegrass music since 1971, and are known for being a progressive group that took Bluegrass music to new heights. Returning this year will be Flatt Lonesome and four-time National Bluegrass Championship Winner Gary "Biscuit" Davis.

  • Scam alert

    There’s a new scam and it’s hit Marion County. Scammers are calling and claiming they are with the Social Security Office. They state there are issues with the person's account and they need to update information so they can continue receiving their Social Security checks. The scammers are asking for social security numbers, bank account information for direct deposit, credit card numbers, etc. Do not give them any information. This is a scam. Don’t ever give personal information to anyone that calls.
     

  • Marion County to host Chinese exchange students

    Eight Chinese exchange students will be making Marion County their home for the next five weeks. They will arrive this Friday, and will be staying with families in the community, attending classes at Marion County High School and participating in school activities, including the upcoming Kentucky Beta Club Convention Jan. 24-26 in Louisville.

  • January Jam

    "He must increase and I must decrease." - John 3:30

    That’s the inspiration behind a new, local Christian praise band that will be making its debut in Lebanon soon.
    CREW 3:30 will be hosting the first-ever January Jam at 8 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 30, at the Lebanon Baptist Church Student Ministry Building.

  • Top talent

    Adria Whitfill said that winning a talent award at the 2016 Kentucky Distinguished Young Women Program was her ultimate goal, and she accomplished that and much more this past weekend at the competition in Lexington.
    After preliminary competitions, Whitfill advanced to the top 12 and competed in the finals where she won an overall talent award.
    Whitfill competed against 32 young women from across the state Jan. 15-16. Lindsey Carroll of Woodford County won the competition Saturday evening.

  • Local charity event to benefit Marion County cancer fighters

    Since March of 2013, when it first accepted applications, Marion County Good Samaritans Foundation has gifted more than $54,000 to 113 Marion County residents undergoing cancer treatment. Every penny of that money came from Marion County residents and went to benefit Marion County residents fighting cancer.

  • Marion County to take Kentucky Beta Convention by storm

    Marion County is going to be well represented at the upcoming Kentucky State Beta Convention Jan. 24-26 in Louisville. Not only will Marion County have the largest club there, but also the state Beta Club president is Marion County High School senior Leah Thompson and the convention is being organized by Marion County High School social studies teacher Jamie Brown, who is serving as the Kentucky state Beta sponsor this year.
    “Beta is a wonderful tradition at our high school,” Brown said. “We have incredible community support. And we have great kids.”

  • New and improved

    Marion County Public Schools have more than $50 million in unmet capital needs, and schools that are busting at the seams, so administrators and school staff are trying their best to use every inch of space they have available at their current facilities.
    Marion County High School recently renovated its library and created a 21st century learning lab, the NextGen Lab, in rooms that were being used for storage.

  • Love unites us

    For some people, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day is just another day off from work or school.
    It’s become a routine holiday for so many of us.
    The three-day holiday weekend is a perk many people enjoy, but Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has given us so much more than that. Community members were reminded of that fact during a special program organized by the local NAACP chapter Sunday afternoon at First Baptist Church in Lebanon.