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Local News

  • Former county judge is the new associate director for local United Way

    Former Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly is the new part-time associate director for the Tri-County Kentucky United Way, which serves Marion, Nelson and Washington counties.
    Mattingly will join Executive Director Kenny Fogle in working to raise funds for more than 25 human and health service charitable organizations serving the Central Kentucky community.
     

  • Lebanon woman re-appointed to state African-American commission

    Angela Nance of Lebanon is one of seven people who were appointed to the Kentucky African-American Heritage Commission by Governor Steve Beshear.
    For Nance, this was a re-appointment, and she is representing the arts community. Her term will expire Feb. 1, 2018.
    Nance works as a workforce investment fiscal officer for the Lincoln Trail Area Development District.

     

  • St. Baldrick’s Cookout is Friday at CNB

    The ninth annual Citizens National Bank St. Baldrick’s Cookout will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday, Feb. 13, at Citizens National Bank in Lebanon. The menu will include a $10 ribeye sandwich meal or a $5 hamburger meal, which will include chips, snack cake and drink. For orders of 10 or more, call 270-692-2113 and ask for Brandy Wiser or Shawn Gibson and your meals will be delivered to you. The annual St. Baldrick’s Foundation head-shaving event will be held Saturday, March 28, at St. Augustine Grade School’s gymnasium.
     

  • Get to work

    Marion County's economy showed signs of improvement during 2014, according to a report presented by Marion County Economic Development Director Tom Lund last week.
    Lund presented the economic development office's annual report during the Feb. 5 Marion County Fiscal Court meeting.
    According to the report, local industries announced seven projects that are expected to bring more than 500 jobs to the county. That's 227 per 10,000 people, which also meant Marion County had the highest per capita job growth of any county in Kentucky last year.

  • Attorney general offers advice to victims of Anthem data breach

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – Attorney General Jack Conway has encouraged Kentuckians who are current or past customers of Anthem health insurance to take steps to protect their personal information and watch for signs of identity theft following a data breach recently announced by Anthem, one of the nation’s largest health insurers.

  • Kynect open enrollment enters its final week

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – With a little more than a week remaining in the current enrollment period, 142,349 individuals have taken advantage of kynect to enroll in healthcare coverage for 2015. This number includes nearly 96,000 Kentuckians who have either newly enrolled in a qualified health plan since Nov. 15, 2014 or renewed the private insurance plan they purchased through kynect last year, according to a state news release.

  • Mid-Continent University bankruptcy case placed on hold

    By Lauren P. Duncan
    The Paducah Sun

    Mid-Continent University is waiting until the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office allows the institution to start collecting student debts to move its bankruptcy case forward.

  • Bills on smoking, beer, casinos advance in General Assembly

    By Tom Loftus
    The Courier-Journal

    In a week where America celebrated Groundhog Day, the General Assembly provided vivid flashbacks of its actions of recent years, with the Republican Senate moving priorities sure to die in the House and the Democratic House moving bills that will die in the Senate.

  • 'Classroom teacher at heart'

    For as long as she can remember, Tammy Newcome has wanted to teach.
    "It seems cliché, but I set the dolls out and would make my brothers be part of my class," Newcome said.
    She fulfilled that dream when she graduated from Western Kentucky University in 1991 and was hired to work as a math teacher at Marion County High School. Today, she serves as an instructional supervisor for Marion County Public Schools.

  • Legislation targets repeat DUI offenders

    A bill to strengthen penalties for habitual drunken drivers in Kentucky became one step closer to law on Thursday with its passage out of a key state Senate committee.
    Senate Bill 34, sponsored by Senator Dennis L. Parrett, would change what is known in legal circles as the “look back period” to 10 years from five years. What that means is that if someone is convicted of drunken driving multiple times in a 10-year period the penalties for the crimes can be increased.