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Local News

  • Arrest made in Bradfordsville break-ins

    The Marion County Sheriff's has arrested an 18-year-old Lebanon man in connection with break-ins that occurred June 6 at Patches Restaurant and Grocery and a private residence in Bradfordsville.

    Joseph Trent Graham was arrested by Deputy Sheriff Tony Belcher on three Marion County bench warrants related to the break-in at Patches and a break-in at a residence on Liberty Road. Graham is being held at Marion County Detention Center on charges of second-degree burglary, third-degree burglary and theft by unlawful taking over $500.

  • Glasscock Elementary site-based council seeks input in principal search

    The Glasscock Elementary Site-Based Decision Making Council completed training to conduct a search for the school's next principal. 

    On June 9, the council will be reviewing applications, setting up interviews for principal candidates and developing interview questions, and the council would like help from the community, according to Todd Farmer, the chairman of the principal search committee. Farmer also serves as the federal programs director for Marion County Public Schools.

  • Marion County man arrested following pursuit
  • 400-Mile Sale returns June 4-7

    Bargain hunters will be roaming the streets once again June 4-7 for the annual 400-Mile Sale. The event follows US 68 and stretches from Maysville, Kentucky, to Paris, Tennessee.
    And Marion County sits in the middle.
    “It’s great for Lebanon because we get so many visitors that come,” said Nena Olivier, executive director of the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission.
    She added that a few bus tours are also staying in Lebanon because of the massive yard sale.

  • GES principal search in early stages

    Jennifer Brogle has resigned as the Glasscock Elementary School principal, and the GES Site-based Decision Making Council will soon begin the search process.
    Tammy Newcome, instructional supervisor for Marion County Public Schools, said the site-based council will meet with Superintendent Taylora Schlosser.
    “They go through training that is specific to the principal selection process,” Newcome said.

  • Breaking ground

    The My New Kentucky Home chapter of Habitat for Humanity held a ceremonial groundbreaking for this year’s build on May 28 at the corner of Lincoln Avenue and Edmonds Avenue. Daphne Staples and her children, Jaquavion and Patience, will be moving into the home once it’s complete.
    Staples said she is looking forward to beginning the build and moving into her home.
    “It feels good,” she said. “It’s just been one of those days.”

  • Firefighter's widow files suit against multiple groups in 2014 death

    By Franklin Clark
    Landmark News Service

    The family of fallen firefighter Tony Grider is suing Kentucky Utilities, Campbellsville University and Pierce Manufacturing in connection with the accident involving last year's Ice Bucket Challenge, which took Grider's life.

  • Bevin gets GOP nod, Dems take off the gloves

    By Brad Bowman
    The State Journal

    Just minutes after James Comer publicly conceded to Republican primary opponent Matt Bevin, the Kentucky Democratic Party wasted no time taking off the gloves.
    In the wake of Thursday’s recanvass, which showed no new votes for the GOP nominee hopeful, Comer released a statement conceding to Bevin saying he grew to “appreciate Matt Bevin’s knowledge of the issues, his work ethic and his morals.”

  • Four Roses plans $55 million expansion in Bullitt and Anderson counties

    By Janet Patton
    Lexington Herald-Leader

    Four Roses Distillery, the premium bourbon rescued from bottom-shelf blended obscurity, is planning a $55 million expansion, including a new still and more warehouses to age its bourbon, which has seen double-digit sales increases in recent years.

  • Louisville eatery helps out bees, menu with rooftop hive

    By Roberto Roldan
    The Courier-Journal

    A colony of honey bees has found a new home atop the Bristol Bar and Grille on Louisville's Bardstown Road, creating a buzz in the community and among experts who say the insects need some help as their numbers dwindle.
    Because bees are important to pollinating a large number of commercial crops in the U.S., advocates have warned of an impending agricultural disaster akin to the Dust Bowl of the 1930s.