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Local News

  • Jail looking to go leaner, greener

    The Marion County Detention Center is the first jail in the United States to receive a grant for a “jail sustainability assessment” from the National Institute of Corrections.
    The assessment will take place over the course of three days and will look at every possible way the detention center can cut costs, and hopefully, serve as a model for other facilities. Monday morning, the jail hosted an opening ceremony to kick-off the assessment

  • Jail loses long-time staffer

    Captain David Earl Gribbins has been a part of the Marion County Detention Center staff ever since Barry Brady was elected jailer 12 years ago.
    Gribbins, 66, died Sunday after suffering a heart attack, according to Brady.
    “He’s very much an important part of our administration’s success at the jail,” Brady said.
    Brady has known Gribbins for 29 years, going back to when they both worked at Marion Adjustment Center.

  • Building memories

    The Marion County Public Library on Saturday hosted storyteller Paschal “The Rascal” Baute followed by “Lunch with Legos.” Baute spent the morning telling tales. Baute is a member of the “Spellbinders” group in Lexington, and he is open to helping start a similar group in Lebanon.

  • Remembering Rakes

    On Friday, Nov. 14, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office dedicated a memorial for all emergency service workers who have died in the line of duty. That day was also the two-year anniversary of the death of Deputy Sheriff Anthony Rakes. Regina Ewing, Rakes’ sister, was pleased with the event.

    “It’s amazing how people still come out in memory of him,” she said.

    Rakes’ other sister, Anita Elder, added, “He is gone, but he is not going to be forgotten.”

  • Lebanon man gets five years for sex abuse

    Ricardo Sunun-Gomez, 34, of 118 Holly Hill Inn in Lebanon was sentenced to five years in prison in Marion Circuit Court last week for six charges of first-degree sexual abuse (victim under 12 years old).
    According to the indictment, the incidents occurred between July 1, 2010, and March 14, 2013. Two different victims were indicated by the indictment.
    Sunun-Gomez will be required to register as a sex offender with the probation and parole office, and a sample of his blood will be taken by the Department of Corrections for DNA law enforcement identification purposes.

  • ‘Coach Rob’ will be missed

    Jeff Robbins’ impact on Marion County High School goes far beyond Xs and Os on the football field.
    "He had ways of teaching you stuff that you think about now, it hits you like a load of bricks," said Matthew Mattingly, who served as one of Robbins’ assistants for 10 years. "He not only impacted the kids. He impacted the coaches 'cause he taught us a lot as well. They've lost a great role model, and we've lost a mentor."

  • School board looks to cut energy use, costs

    The Marion County Board of Education is looking to make changes that will improve the efficiency of the heating and cooling systems throughout the district — which will in turn save money for the district and its taxpayers.
    After debating the merit of proposals and counter-proposals from two companies, the board voted 3-2 at its Nov. 11 meeting to approve the original proposal presented by CMTA Consulting Engineers.

  • Former school board secretary seeks reinstatement of unemployment benefits

    A former school board secretary has filed six separate but related complaints against the Kentucky Unemployment Insurance Commission and the Marion County Board of Education.
    On Nov. 12, Pam Spalding filed six “verified complaints seeking judicial review of a decision of the Kentucky Unemployment Insurance Commission” in Marion Circuit Court.

  • Building future leaders

    T.J. Veatch wants to give something back to the Marion County community, and the Marion County High School senior believes he’s found a way to do that as one of the founding members of the student ambassadors program at Marion County High School.
    “Through the application process, you could tell they wanted true leaders,” Veatch said.
    His fellow senior Paris Manson agreed, adding that they want to show the community what amazing things students are doing in local schools.

  • Honoring those who served

    Marion County High School hosted its annual Veteran Day program on Nov.  11. The JROTC program ran the program, and the featured speaker was Congressman Ed Whitfield.  To the veterans in attendance, Whitfield said, “On behalf of a grateful nation, thank you for you service, for your sacrifice.” As part of the program, the students also shared the history of “The Star Spangled Banner,” which was written 200 years ago.