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Local News

  • Superintendent: School system needs stability

    Superintendent Taylora Schlosser believes the Marion County Board of Education made the right decision by granting her more time to establish residency in Marion County.

    Moving to the county is still something she is trying to do.

  • From one fraternity to another

    In 2006, Richard Goodin graduated with a mechanical engineering degree from the University of Kentucky, where he also served as the president of Farmhouse Fraternity.

    Looking back, he said fraternity life helped him make the transition into a new life as a Franciscan friar and, more recently, priest.

    “From one fraternity to another,” Fr. Goodin said. “And we do call our way of living as Franciscans a fraternity.”

  • Model jets show returns July 6-13

     The 10th annual Jets Over Kentucky will begin Sunday, July 6, at the Lebanon-Springfield Airport.  

    Jets Over Kentucky is now the largest remote control model jet show in the world, and event organizers anticipate more then 200 model jet pilots from across the globe at this year’s event.

    Pilots will be practicing and flying warm-up runs July 6-10, and spectators are welcome to watch. 

  • Bridge will be named to honor nun

     Sr. Sodelbia Hughes was born at the end of the 19th century. Later this month, in the 21st century, a bridge will be renamed in her honor.

    Perhaps the timing is fitting for a woman who was 50 years ahead of her time, according to one of her colleagues, Sr. Kay Carlew.

    “She was a teacher. She was a social worker, and she was a politician, in the best sense of the word,” Carlew said.

  • New judge appointed in election lawsuit

    A new judge has been appointed in the lawsuit contesting the results of the May 20 Republican primary election in the race for the 24th District state representative.

    On June 23, Circuit Judge David A. Tapp of the 28th Judicial Circuit was appointed to preside over the case. Marion Circuit Judge Dan Kelly and Circuit Judge David Williams of the 40th Judicial Circuit each recused themselves from the case.

  • July is full of activities in Marion County

     The Marion County Fair continues to through Saturday, and the Jets Over Kentucky model jet show returns to central Kentucky on Sunday.

    But, that’s only part of what will be happening in July.

    The carnival will open at 5 p.m. each night for the remainder of the fair.

    Wednesday, July 2, at the fair, senior citizen’s day events begin at 10 a.m. The rabbit show starts at 6 p.m., and KOI Drag racing starts at 7 p.m.

  • Maker’s Mark welcome center approved for tax incentive

     The Kentucky Tourism Development Finance Authority has approved the welcome center at Maker’s Mark Distillery for a tourism incentive.

    KTDFA announced June 26 that the Maker’s Mark welcome center and a hotel in Paducah had been approved for the incentives.

    Maker’s Mark received approval for a $2.03 million welcome center, which will include food services and additional parking.

  • Marion County native to open new distillery

    A former master distiller for Maker’s Mark has returned to Central Kentucky to open a new distillery.

     

    Gov. Steve Beshear was on hand to announce the opening of the Bardstown Bourbon Company June 26 in Bardstown.

    Steve Nally, who has worked for more than 40 years in the bourbon industry, including 33 years at Maker’s Mark, will serve as the master distiller for the new venture. Nally is also a member of the Bourbon Hall of Fame.

  • July is made for ice cream

     By Matt Overing

    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    It’s National Ice Cream Month. 

    Former President Ronald Reagan proclaimed July to be National Ice Cream Month on July 9, 1984. This year, it’s the 30-year anniversary.

    Whether you’ll be celebrating with friends and family inside or out, one thing is certain: There’s no wrong way to eat ice cream.

  • Books recount Bradfordsville and Gravel Switch histories

     By Matt Overing

    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    Picture a world where Native Americans hunted freely, where there were no automobiles, no machines and where infamous criminals razed buildings on a consistent basis.

    Welcome to the Bradfordsville area, circa 1776. The area’s first settlers, nicknamed the “Longhunters,” came from Virginia in search of fertile lands and lush forests, according to Eula Ray Kirkland.