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Local News

  • New details released in Raywick murder investigation

    David Litsey Jr. was 22 years old when he died Nov. 9, 2012. He would have turned 24 last week.
    The trial for the man accused of killing him is scheduled for July 14, although the trial has been rescheduled multiple times already.
    Christopher Gribbins, 47, of 821 Dangerfield Road in Hodgenville remains in custody at the Marion County Detention Center, while his trial is pending. Gribbins is the owner of the Raywick Bar and Grill, where Litsey was shot. Litsey later died at Spring View Hospital.

  • Fast times at Cedars of Lebanon Nursing Home

    Cedars of Lebanon Nursing Home residents were recently treated to a visit by Steven Peterson and "LOAD'EM UP Racing." The visit was organized by Communicare Specialized Services staff, who worked with Peterson to bring his racecar to the nursing home on June 6. The residents were quite impressed.

  • Stories Fer Rednecks – Leaving a legacy

    By Matt Overing
    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    Dan and Nick Thompson have seen crazy things happen. They’ve heard about crazy things that have happened. And they’ve written a book about it.
    Dan and Nick have actually written two books: Thompson Family History and Stories Fer Rednecks. Both have crazy stories, but just one tells some of the family history.
    “People have been telling us how much they like them,” Nick said.

  • More time to move

    A divided Marion County Board of Education voted Thursday to give Superintendent Taylora Schlosser an additional 18 months to establish her residency in Marion County.
    By a vote of 3-1, the board approved the change during a special called meeting June 19. Board Chairman DeLane Pinkston and board members Butch Cecil and Mike Cecil voted in favor of amending the superintendent’s contract to grant the extension. Board member Bernard Miles opposed the extension.
    The board’s decision came after an executive session that lasted more than an hour.

  • Finance director staying put

    While the Marion County Board of Education spent most of the public portion of its June 19 meeting addressing the superintendent’s residency, that wasn’t the only issue affecting local schools last week.
    Marion County Public Schools recently learned that they have the potential for a bonding capacity of up to $5.89 million. 
    The report was provided to the district by Mark Rawlings, the vice president of Hilliard and Lyons in Paducah.

  • High school report cards available to pick up

    Parents of high school students can now pick up report cards at Marion County High School.

    Office hours are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. However, the office is closed from noon until 1 p.m. for lunch.

  • Fiscal court meets Thursday

    The Marion County Fiscal Court is scheduled to meet in regular session at 4 p.m. Thursday on the second floor of the David R. Hourigan Government Building.

    The agenda includes the following items:

    - Minutes of the previous meeting

    - Flex fund and discretionary road fund list/request

    - Annual contract with the Lincoln Trail District health department

  • Special city council meeting Thursday

    The Lebanon City Council is scheduled to hold a special-called meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 19, at city hall.

    The agenda includes the second reading of the amended 2013-14 budget and the second reading of the 2014-15 budget.

    The agenda also includes a resolution in support of a community development block grant application for Lebanon Power and Apparatus.

    The final item is a resolution supporting the condemnation of 200 Boldrick Avenue.

  • Divided board votes to give superintendent 18-month extension to establish residency

    A divided Marion County Board of Education has voted to give Superintendent Taylora Schlosser an additional 18 months to establish her residency in Marion County.

  • Still going strong

    The first Old Mill Day was held in 1989, and for a quarter century, the celebration has remained a time when the Bradfordsville community comes together.

    Admittedly, it was a noticeably smaller affair when it first began.

    “We had the supper. We had fireworks. We had music,” Bradfordsville Mayor David Edelen recalled.

    The idea for Old Mill Day, in a way, rose out of what many in the community considered a sad event — the closing of the Bradfordsville School in 1984.