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Today's News

  • Making small deposits

    It’s zero degrees outside but that doesn’t keep Dallas Robinson from sweating. Steam rolls off his body and his heart pounds as he stands ready to push the bobsled into motion with his other teammates. He knows he could die. It’s happened to other athletes in the past. After all, he’s about to get on a sled that will reach up to 95 miles per hour and he’s wearing limited protective gear. He could be ejected. The sled could flip over. But all he’s thinking about is the push.

  • Marion Adjustment Center to reopen

    Because of the overcrowding of jails throughout Kentucky, the state is looking toward private facilities to alleviate some of the stress. According to Marion County Jailer Barry Brady, that means the Marion Adjustment Center will open sometime in the near future.

  • Zoning board tables decision

    The Rev. Bill Bowling stared down a large crowd of people, but this wasn’t his usual congregation. Without enough chairs, Lebanon City Hall was packed to the walls with citizens wanting to see what the Board of Zoning Adjustments would decide. Would they allow the house at 150 E. Main St. to become a transitional home or would they deny it?

  • Loretto working to fix sewer problems

    The City of Loretto wants to do everything it can to avoid increasing its sewer rates, but that’s going to require some cooperation from its residents.
    Approximately 30 residents attended Thursday’s Loretto City Council meeting to discuss the city’s sewer issues.
    “The goal is to not raise the sewer rates, and it’s getting very close to doing that,” Loretto Mayor Tom Brahm said.

  • Arena could cost $25 million

    It’s back to the drawing board for those in charge of planning the new multipurpose facility.
    The Multipurpose Facility Committee met on Aug. 15 to discuss the potential blueprints of the facility with engineers, but was slammed with a much larger price tag than previously anticipated. Before, the committee had estimated the cost to be around $4 million, but in their most recent meeting, engineers from CFW Associated Engineers Inc. said the cost could go as high as $25 million.

  • Fiscal court helps honor guard get a new ride

    The Marion County Veterans Honor Guard is getting some much-needed financial assistance from the Marion County Fiscal Court to purchase a new bus.
    Paul Powell, a member of the honor guard, addressed the court during its regular monthly meeting Aug. 18. He informed the court that the honor guard has been using their current bus, which is a 1997 model, since 2004. It has more than 217,000 miles on it.
    “It’s in bad shape. We need help,” Powell said.

  • That's a wrap

    By Nick Schrager
    Landmark News Service

  • Board tables decision

    After two hours of listening to a heated debate, the City of Lebanon Board of Zoning Adjustments decided to table its decision about allowing a transitional home at 150 E. Main St. Father Bill Bowling is leading the project, and hoped to get a yes vote during the meeting. He was met with a lot of opposition, however, and board members ended the meeting with questions of their own. They finally voted to table the decision so the members could think on the matter further. No date has been set for the next meeting.

  • Overcrowding jail cells

    The Marion County Detention Center is facing a dilemma, as is every other jail in the state of Kentucky and across the nation.
    It’s overcrowded.
    It’s not a unique problem, and the solution is even more difficult to get a handle on. While the number of inmates continues to increase, so does the number of inmates that must be housed in isolation, due to drugs and mental health issues. Isolation needs create even more overcrowding issues for the jail, as well as staffing issues and a financial strain on the facility, which is almost 20 years old.

  • A true country store

    There can be some measure of comfort in familiarity. It’s that constant, that thing a person might take for granted because it is always there no matter what. For many people in Raywick, Blandford’s Store has always been there. Now, after more than 60 years of family ownership, the store is up for sale.
    Owned by Judy and Tommy Blandford since 1986, Judy said it is time for someone else to take it on.