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Today's News

  • US Representative candidate – Wesley Bolin

     Wesley Bolin, 25, is both an employee and a student at Murray State University. He started his collegiate career in 2007 at Yale University, and he has divided his time between Yale and Murray State, while seeking to complete his degree in history.

    Bolin’s father is a history professor and a Kentucky historian at Murray State, and his mother is an elementary teacher. Bolin works in the special collections at the Pogue Library at Murray State.

    1. Why are you running for Congress?

  • US Representative candidate – Charles Hatchett

     Charles Hatchett, 62, first ran for Congress in 2010, and he challenged Whitfield again in 2012.

    The first time, he received 62,090 votes, and the second time, he picked up 87,199 votes, although he acknowledged Whitfield won comfortably both times. (In 2012, Marion County was the only county in the district that Hatchett won.)

  • StoryWalk at the park April 25-27

    Central Kentucky Head Start is hosting The StoryWalk at Graham Memorial Park from April 25-27, and everyone is welcome to visit.
    The StoryWalk promotes physical activity by combining walking with reading children’s books. In the StoryWalk, the pages of a book are turned into signs, which are laid out on a trail. By walking the trail, families, children and the community follow the pages of the book.

  • Inaugural Green Festival coming this month

    By John Overby
    Landmark News Service

    “Local products, local food, local fun!”
    That is the tagline for the first-ever Springfield Green Festival, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday, April 26, along Depot Street (the road where the new farmers market is located).
    Organized by the New Pioneers for a Sustainable Future, the event will, in part, focus on teaching the local population about how it can help the environment and how it can be fiscally beneficial for someone to “go green.”

  • Beshear undecided on special session on heroin

    By Mike Wynn
    The Courier-Journal

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – Hours after an effort to stem heroin abuse died in the Kentucky legislature, Gov. Steve Beshear said April 16 that he hasn’t decided whether to call a special session to resurrect the bill.
    Proposals to combat heroin with tougher penalties for dealers and more money for treatment languished on the House floor on the night of April 15 as lawmakers debated smaller bills and ran short on time. But supporters say the issue is too important to wait until 2015.

  • LMS has a new principal

    Christina McRay has been named principal at Lebanon Middle School.
    The Lebanon Middle School-Based Decision Making Council unanimously selected McRay as the new principal during its meeting on Wednesday, April 16.

  • MCPS looking for new special education director

    The Marion County Public School System is searching for a new special education director.
    Amber Ervin, who was hired as the special education director in 2012 by former Superintendent Chuck Hamilton, will be returning to the classroom next school year.

  • State's snow, ice costs climb to $68 million this winter

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – A winter season punctuated by a polar vortex, sub-zero temperatures, and nasty snow and crippling ice storms created more than a traveling nuisance for Kentucky residents. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet spent more than $68 million on snow and ice removal – about 1 1/2 times the cost of a typical Kentucky winter.

  • Mid-Continent classes still meet despite decision to close

    By Kathleen Fox
    The Paducah Sun

    MAYFIELD - One day after Mid-Continent University announced full layoffs and a closure date at the end of June, students, faculty and staff members worked to salvage what’s left of the more than 60-year-old college.

  • Guard against phishing in wake of Heartbleed Bug

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – With reports of the Heartbleed bug spreading like wildfire, it’s important to stay vigilant against potential scams.
    The Kentucky Department of Financial Institutions is warning consumers about possible phishing attempts in the wake of the Heartbleed bug – a critical security vulnerability that has put many systems at risk.