.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Fiscal Court approves agreement for Maker’s Mark access road

    The Marion County Fiscal Court has approved an agreement with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet for a new access road on Hwy. 52.
    This road will provide a new access point to Maker’s Mark, according to the agreement between the county and the state.
    The agreement reads that the state will reimburse the county up to $675,000 for the .1 mile project, which will allow access to the Maker’s Mark Museum. Also as part of the project, the access to Ky. 52 from Bridgett Court will be closed and a new access will be created to the tie-in road.

  • MCHS SBDM Council vacancy

    Marion County High School currently has a vacancy on the School-Based Decision Making Council. Any parent with a child at the high school interested in serving on the SBDM council should contact Kathy Jo Underwood at 270-692-6066, extension 150.

  • Heritage Center seeks recipes for historic cookbook

    The Marion County Heritage Center is publishing a cookbook in 2015 to celebrate Lebanon’s 200th anniversary. The books will be sold at the Heritage Center gift shop.
    The cookbook will feature divider pages with pictures and information about former eating locations and restaurants, dating back to the 1800s. The book's organizers also hope to include recipes from some of those establishments.

  • Habitat for Humanity - Bardstown Blitz

    By Randy Patrick
    Landmark News Service

    Daniel Greenwell was covered in dust and sweat Saturday afternoon when he put down his hammer, picked up a cold drink and surveyed the progress he and other Habitat for Humanity volunteers had made on the two houses they’re building side by side on McGowan Avenue.
    The frames for both had been put up in less than 48 hours.
    “I don’t work this hard for a living,” he said.
    Curtis Greenwell laughed when he heard what his younger brother had said.

  • Kentucky ends fiscal 2014 with $90 million shortfall

    The Courier-Journal

    Kentuckians are buying more stuff, but they aren’t paying as much in taxes, and that has left the state with a $90 million revenue shortfall.
    The state budget office released the year-end report on general fund receipts Thursday, showing that the amount of tax revenue collected in fiscal year 2014 fell 1 percent short of the official $9.55 billion estimate when it ended June 30.

  • Governor, congressman announce next steps for statewide high-speed broadband project

    Kentucky Press News Service

    FRANKFORT – Gov. Steve Beshear and U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers announced July 11 that two requests for proposals are being issued this month on a public-private partnership project to build critically needed high-speed broadband Internet access to the farthest reaches of the state.
    Increasing broadband access in Eastern Kentucky is a primary focus of the project.

  • Flying high again

    By Matt Overing

    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    Jets Over Kentucky is back at the Lebanon-Springfield Airport.

    Lewis Patton organized the event, and he said around 200 pilots will be participating in this year.

    It will be the 10th year that the event has taken place. Pilots love the event, and Patton said that is because of the community. 

  • Fair weather

     This year, the Marion County Fair had the weather on its side. Last year, rain forced the cancellation of several days of events. 

    “It was outstanding compared to last year,” fair board member Charlotte Miracle said. “We had no rain and good attendance.”

    Miracle said they had good turnout for both days of pageants, including higher local attendance as well.

  • Council hears flood report

    After eight months of work, O’Brien and Gere Engineers presented the findings of their study of flooding in downtown Lebanon.

    During the 54-minute presentation, Ken Roseman, Jonathan Steflik and Derek Reid presented the city with a variety of options to address the problem. The potential solutions included everything from removing sediment and debris to upgrading the entire conveyance system at a cost of $3.82 million.

    The city paid the engineering firm $118,797. 

  • Special city council meetings Friday, Monday

    The Lebanon City Council is holding special-called meetings at 5:30 p.m. Friday, July 11, and 5:30 p.m. Monday, July 14.

    The agenda for Friday's meeting includes the second reading of an ordinance, which would remove 10-minute parking on the 200 block of W. Main Street and replace it with two-hour parking. The first reading of this ordinance was approved at the council's July 7 meeting.