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Today's News

  • St. Catharine College announces $150 million expansion

    The future is looking bright at St. Catharine College, and in many ways, the future is now.

    SCC President William D. Huston unveiled the college's new Vision 2025 plan Wednesday. That plan includes several campus over the next 15 years at an estimated cost of $150 million.

  • Lady Knights return with experience

    The Marion County High School girl's tennis team lost no one to graduation after last season and bring back several conference champions.

    Senior Kameron Simmons, last year's Heartland Athletic Conference (HAC) tournament singles champion, leads the Lady Knights in singles competition.

    "Kameron Simmons returns as our number one singles. She is hoping to have a strong season again this year and defend her Heartland Conference singles champion title," girl's tennis Head Coach Angela Holt said.

  • County offices make changes for Easter weekend

    Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly has reported a change in the garbage collection schedule for Friday, April 2. Due to the Easter weekend, the road department will run a short scheduled on Friday. As a result garbage collection may run earlier than usual.

    County residents are asked to put their garbage out a little earlier than usual for pick up this Friday.

    Saturday, April 3, the David R. Hourigan Government Center, the PVA's Office, the County Judge's Office and the County Clerk's Office will be closed.

  • Police looking for missing 14-year-old

    The Lebanon Police have issued a missing person's report for Fernanda Ponce, 14.

    Ponce was last seen March 26. She is a Hispanic female. No picture is available at this time.

    The police have also issued a kidnapping report in connection with this case.

    Anyone with information about Ponce's location should call the Lebanon Police at 692-2121 or the Kentucky State Police at 1-800-222-5555.

  • Police searching for inmate that escaped while doing community service

    Lebanon Police are looking for James Shell, 45, an inmate who was being housed at the Marion County Detention Center.

    Shell was performing community service at the Marion County Animal Shelter when he walked away around 2:45 p.m. Wednesday, March 17.

    Shell is a white male, 5 feet, 9 inches tall and weighs approximately 260 pounds. The photo provided shows Shell with a beard. However, he is currently clean-shaven, according to the Kentucky State Police.

    Shell had been serving a five years sentence for flagrant non-support. He was convicted June 17, 2008.

  • Spring View Hospital CEO resigns

    Spring View Hospital is in the midst of an $8 million expansion, and it's also in search for a new chief executive officer.

    Mike Sherrod, who has been Spring View's CEO since December of 2007, announced his resignation March 15.

  • Headlong

    Wearing his hair short is nothing new for Angel Pasqual. He was a Marine for eight years.

    But for the last four years, Pasqual has participated in St. Baldrick's as a member of the Marion Adjustment Center team.

    "I figure this is for a better cause," he said.

    Pasqual has a personal reason to participate as well. Both his parents had cancer.

    "I just hate to see somebody's little kid go through that," he said.

  • Youth on display

    With twin towers on the mound, anything can happen this season for Marion County's baseball squad.

    Knights Head Coach Chad Spalding and his team will lean heavily on senior Tyler Wright at times as the team tries to improve on last season's 14-12 record.

    "Tyler Wright brings a presence. He's a kid that has been around many parks and many games," Spalding said.

  • Believe it or not, tourism exists in our community

    Disc golf is not my thing.

    Neither is flying miniature jet airplanes.

    And, while my late father would be so disappointed to hear this, I don't dig bluegrass music either.

    But, just because I don't enjoy those things, doesn't mean there aren't hundreds, if not thousands, of other people who do. In fact, there are people who travel to participate in activities like these. Some even travel to Lebanon, as a matter of fact.

     

  • Community servant

    Shelton Young can't remember a time when he wasn't involved with Ham Days. He recalls Ham Days when the temperature exceeded 100 degrees, when the weather was freezing and when it rained for five days, except for the time the parade was scheduled.

    "That was some kind of divine intervention," Young said.

    Perhaps it's no coincidence that one of his favorite Ham Days memories also involved the parade.