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Today's News

  • Public and Private Partnership

    Gov. Steve Beshear made a quick stop in Marion County last week to present a $1 million check to the City of Lebanon.

    While Lebanon Mayor Gary Crenshaw admits that a visit from the governor is always welcomed, it's even better when he has a check in hand.

    However, this time it was a bit more personal for Crenshaw.

    The check, which was a $1 million Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), will benefit Angell-Demmel North America Corp., with its upcoming expansion.

  • House budget helps families

    When the Kentucky House of Representatives adopted its two-year budget several weeks ago, my colleagues and I had three main priorities: Streamline government; protect education and our most vulnerable citizens; and kick-start our economy.

  • CLASS-ified

    Artistic and cultural opportunities could become a regular attraction at Centre Square if everything goes according to plan.

    St. Catharine College officials are looking for ways to expand their outreach to Marion County, and they see Centre Square as the venue to make that happen.

    Marion Countians could work toward college degrees and take continuing education courses - in a classroom setting - without needing to leave the county, according to a proposal presented to the Lebanon City Council earlier this month.

  • Try these easy Easter dinner recipes

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  • Baseball team faces busy week

    The Marion County baseball team takes on a tough schedule this week, facing a tough 12th Region foe and participating in their first wooden bat tournament.

    On Thursday, the Knights travel to Boyle County to face the Rebels.

    "They're always pretty solid. They're one of the better teams in the state," baseball Head Coach Chad Spalding said. "They always play a pretty tough schedule."

  • New chief takes the reins

    The City of Lebanon has a new chief of police.

    Joseph Bell was sworn in as the chief Saturday afternoon following a special-called meeting of the Lebanon City Council. Wally Brady was sworn in as the new assistant chief.

    Bell is the first African-American to serve as Lebanon's chief of police.

    After taking the oath of office, Bell said he has been working toward becoming a chief for 20 years. He added that fairness would be his main focus as the new leader of the department.

  • Coalition to present drug testing proposal to school board Tuesday, April 6

    The Marion County Safe Community Coalition is scheduled to present a proposal at the school board meeting Tuesday evening, April 6, to begin a drug-testing program at Marion County High School.

    The coalition is proposing that the high school randomly drug test 260 students during the 2010-11 school year. Students and their parents will be required to sign a statement that they volunteer to be a part of the program for the upcoming year.

  • Maroon - White scrimmage set for Thursday

    Marion County football Head Coach Jeff Robbins and his staff entered spring practice with a lot of questions. Practice is officially over after Thursday's Maroon - White scrimmage, but a lot of those questions will remain unanswered.

    "Right now we're just trying to see where everybody is," Robbins said. "Some guys have stepped up. Some guys need to step up, because they're not there yet. All and all it's been a very productive spring practice."

  • Closing doors

    In a landmark decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, Justice William Brennan wrote this country has "a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."

     

    Kentucky legislators failed to honor that principle when they voted to allow elected school board members to evaluate the performance of school superintendents in secret.

     

  • Students, parents concerned about JROTC's future

    Elizabeth Matusz, a cadet in the Marion County High School JROTC program, stood before the high school's site-based council March 24. While occasionally fighting tears, she urged the council to allow the program to continue.

    "Give us one more year to get our numbers back up and to get our program back to what it can be," she said.

    A room filled with students, parents, former JROTC members and instructors were also there to show their support for the program.