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Today's News

  • Friends liked Coconut-Pecan Bars

    My dad was a great eater. He loved good food and was always sending me recipes to try.

    Most of them were desserts as he had a serious sweet tooth.

    He sent me this recipe for Coconut-Pecan Bars and I just last week discovered it in the drawer and got around to trying it.

    It was good and well received by all the guinea pigs that tried it (my poker group.)

    Personally, I thought it was plenty sweet enough without adding the glaze on top but you can see what you think.

  • Teams scramble to make up games

    Last month's ice storm have teams playing a flurry of games over the next week.

    The Knights will play four games in five days while the Lady Knights will play five games in six days.

    The Lady Knights begin a grueling series of games with North Hardin (19-3) on Thursday night at North Hardin.

    North Hardin is a top three team in the region and ranked 11th in the Litkenhous Ratings.

    Tip-off is set for 7:30 p.m. at North Hardin on Thursday.

  • More than 400 Marion Countians still without power as of Monday

    Approximately 425 Inter County Energy customers in Marion County are still without power nearly three weeks after the ice storm hit and caused devastating power outages across the entire state.

  • Mother Nature's icy wrath causes power and water outages

    The ice came. It stayed. It conquered.

    Marion County got hit hard by the winter storm that arrived late Monday, Jan. 26, and early Tuesday, Jan. 27.

    Ice blanketed the county and seemingly everything in it. Flowers, streetlights, trees, power lines and yard ornaments appeared to be encased for several days.

    Emergency personnel ran themselves ragged trying to keep up with the seemingly endless calls.

  • Don't pick trees solely based on ice storm

    As expected I had several people ask me what was the best tree species to plant in place of the ones being cut down and they want ones that will survive the next ice storm.

    Well, the answer is, there isn't one?

    All tree species sustained damage, however some worse than others.  For instance, "Bradford" pear was destroyed and it's a no brainer to not plant them again, because they also fail in high winds pretty regularly.  

    There are some that were damaged pretty badly but they still have their place in the landscape.

  • More bad weather, more trouble for plants

    It seems we are in the middle of yet another "situation," as my husband calls it, served up by Mother Nature.

    At present we are right in the middle of the mess out at the farm. No electricity, no phone line, no heat, and no water.

    We can manage well enough inside with the fireplace, kerosene heater, camp stove, down comforter and strategic water rationing (with supplements brought in from town).  Outside is a different story.

  • 'People helping people'

    "Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up. Therefore, as we have opportunity, let us do good to all people ...."  - Galatians 6:9-10

    Bruce Catoe had a warning for Richard Miller, who was busy loading logs onto a wheelbarrow on Montgomery Court Sunday evening.

    "The man who loads the wheelbarrow gets to push it," Catoe said.

  • Governor announces state assistance for removal of storm debris

    Tuesday, Feb., 10, Gov. Steve Beshear announced a plan for collecting and removing vegetative debris - tree trunks, limbs and brush - to speed Kentucky's recovery from a disastrous snow and ice storm.

    "Loss of electric power and communications is not the only hardship our fellow Kentuckians have had to cope with in storm areas," Gov. Beshear said. "Now we face the long, hard work of cleaning up the damage."

  • Marion County can take storm debris to Fairgrounds Road

    Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly has issue the following statement regarding storm debris: 

  • There's no place like home

    Stacking cases of bottled water into the back of a pickup truck Friday afternoon at Marion County High School, Geraldine Livers of Raywick summed up the past week in one simple, yet profound, sentence.

    "Mother Nature knocked us to our knees this time," she said.