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Today's News

  • Rescued at sea

    Lebanon residents Bill Durham and Barbara May returned from a recent cruise in the Caribbean with some rather interesting souvenirs.
    While at sea on March 2, headed toward Jamaica, they witnessed a sea rescue of eight Cuban men, and they have the photos to prove it.
    “We were at sea, and all of a sudden the ship stopped,” Durham told the Enterprise recently. “We wondered what was going on, so we looked over the balcony and saw some of the crew from the ship rescuing these guys.”

  • A Day for Writers

    The Friends of the Library hosted Authors Day at the Marion County Public Library for writers with local ties to meet readers and sell a few books. A portion of the proceeds from those sales went to the Friends.

  • 25-year-old dies in accident on Miller Pike

     A 25-year-old man from Raywick died Sunday evening as a result of a single-vehicle accident on Miller Pike.

  • Horns of Plenty

    Members of the Kentucky Baroque Trumpets performed a concert Saturday evening before a small but committed group of listeners April 11 at St. Augustine Church. John Foster, an internationally renowned musician from Australia, performed with the group, along with music students from the University of Kentucky. The Kentucky Baroque Trumpets are preparing to perform May 1-3 in Springfield, Illinois, as part of the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's funeral.

  • Distracted driving: 'It's the new drunk driving'

    By Judah Taylor
    Landmark News Service

    While seizing the first taste of spring behind his motorcycle’s handlebars, Kevin Fields says he was nearly side-swiped by a woman who wasn’t paying attention to him or the road and was only focusing on the make-up she was applying.
    Though Fields, 49, has been riding since he was 5, he sold his bike that day.
    “It just aggravated me so much,” he said. “And I just decided I’m going to quit riding for a few years.”

  • Heart attack: The top killer of people at work in Kentucky

    Kentucky Press News Service

    In keeping with its mission to protect workers in the state, the Kentucky Labor Cabinet examined the causes of worker fatalities each year in Kentucky from 2012-14, and found the heart attack was the overwhelming No. 1 cause of death at work.

  • Anti-drug czar: 'Every life is worth saving'

    By Terry DeMio
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    COVINGTON – The stigma of drug addiction, the stigma of using medicine to treat it, the stigma of needle exchange and the idea that a life-saving drug shouldn't be used for overdose victims all need to end.
    Michael Botticelli, the director of White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, delivered these messages when he visited Northern Kentucky on April 9.

  • Kentucky gets a 'D' on gender wage gap

    By Pam Wright
    The Advocate-Messenger

    So you Know: Equal Pay Day was Tuesday. The date symbolizes how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year. Originating in 1966 by the National Committee on Pay Equity, the day is meant to bring awareness to the gap between men’s and women’s wages. Those supporting equal pay for men and women wore red to commemorate the day.
    Kentucky is not faring well when it comes to gender pay equality, according to the results of a resent report.

  • Study explains workforce needs

    By Taryn Phaneuf
    Bowling Green Daily News

    After decades of watching demand for a more educated workforce increase dramatically, researchers have identified the cause.
    Productivity improvements, consumer demands and technological advances have moved many American jobs out of factories and into offices, hospitals and schools, according to a study published today by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

  • Kentucky launches aerospace study

    By Brandon Mattingly
    Landmark News Service

    Gov. Steve Beshear signed a resolution recently to kick start a study into the aviation and aerospace industry and its impact on Kentucky's economy. The goal of the study is to expand on an area that has already become the state's largest export.