.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • 11-12 boys are district runner-up

    Baseball tournaments are won with a series of victories and defeats. Unfortunately for the Marion County All-Star baseball teams, their seasons did not end with either taking the District 5 tournament at Idle Hour Park in Springfield.

    Though they did not come out on top, the 11-12-year-old All-Star team did finish as the runner-up in the tournament when they fell to Campbellsville, 12-0, on July 4. 

    Coach Steve Hayes said the team showed a lot of persistence. 

  • Soccer will keep growing

    By Matt Overing

    Enterprise intern

    Soccer is growing in America. The United States made it out of the “Group of Death” and into the knockout round of the most prestigious soccer tournament in the world.

    The United States Men’s National Team lost, but the legacy that the 2014 team left should be lasting.

  • New coach ready to cast off

    After nearly a year of turbulent times, Marion County High School’s bass fishing team is finally coming into fruition. A coach has been recommended for the job, and all that is left is to have him be approved by the MCHS Site-Based Decision Making council later this month. 

    His name is Jason Spalding, and he’s been fishing since he was old enough to hold a rod and crank a reel. 

  • Former Lady Knights transfer to play for Kentucky State, St. Catharine College

     By Matt Overing

    matthew.overing@uky.edu

    Two members of the 2012-13 undefeated Marion County Lady Knights basketball team will be changing schools for the 2014-15 school year. 

    Patrice Tonge is transferring from the University of Pikeville to St. Catharine College.

    Tonge said her decision to transfer to St. Catharine was “nothing major, just a personal decision.” 

  • Youth soccer sign-ups are July 19 and 26

     Sign-ups for the Marion County Youth Soccer Association fall season will take place from 9 a.m. to noon July 19 and 26 at the Graham Memorial Park Soccer Complex concession stand on Fairgrounds Road in Lebanon.  

    The registration deadline is Aug. 2. 

  • Varmints, fish and the Fourth of July

    I hope everyone had a good and safe holiday weekend. The wife and I spent most of the weekend enjoying the festivities in Campbellsville with the Grundys.

    Campbellsville does July 4 like we do Ham Days. All in all, a fun weekend with good friends.

    ***

  • Catching UP with ... Billy Grant

    Billy Grant was the 2008 Marion County High School graduate and 2008 Male Athlete of the Year.

    • Played baseball at the University of the Cumber-lands.

    • Was a midweek starting pitcher during his freshman year.

    • Injuries plagued his sophomore season, came back to the team as a reliever. By the time he fully recovered, it was time for him to graduate.

  • Touchy Subject

    Education is, and probably always will be, a touchy subject. 

    In Marion County, the school system has been a particularly touchy subject in recent months, and based on the letters to the editor we received this week, it probably will be for the foreseeable future.

    Last week, we reported Superintendent Taylora Schlosser’s response to the board of education’s decision to grant her another 18 months to move to Marion County. She saw that as a necessary decision to provide stability to the system.

  • Work Ready has its advantages

    By Kim Huston

     As communities look for an edge in today’s competitive global economy, there are few things as powerful as developing a high-quality workforce. 

    Here in the Lincoln Trail region, it’s exciting to see multiple counties taking steps to develop a highly skilled workforce that is ready to go to work. Leaders in those counties have applied or are in the process of applying for Work Ready Community certification.

  • Council hears flood report

    After eight months of work, O’Brien and Gere Engineers presented the findings of their study of flooding in downtown Lebanon.

    During the 54-minute presentation, Ken Roseman, Jonathan Steflik and Derek Reid presented the city with a variety of options to address the problem. The potential solutions included everything from removing sediment and debris to upgrading the entire conveyance system at a cost of $3.82 million.

    The city paid the engineering firm $118,797.