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Today's News

  • Fast times at Cedars of Lebanon Nursing Home

    Cedars of Lebanon Nursing Home residents were recently treated to a visit by Steven Peterson and "LOAD'EM UP Racing." The visit was organized by Communicare Specialized Services staff, who worked with Peterson to bring his racecar to the nursing home on June 6. The residents were quite impressed.

  • Gun laws loosen, concealed-carry permits spike

    By Scott Wartman
    The Kentucky Enquirer

    Over the past 10 years, Kentucky has made it easier to carry guns – and statistics show more Kentuckians are carrying concealed firearms than ever before.
    Judging by one of the first few bills filed early for the 2015 session, it doesn’t look like the General Assembly will change direction on guns anytime soon.

  • Budget shortfall raises spending cut fears in Kentucky

    By Tom Loftus
    The Courier-Journal

  • Curbing carbon could help improve air quality

    By James Bruggers
    The Courier-Journal

    The Matel family moved from Toronto to Louisville three years ago, arriving during a smoggy August summer.
    At the time, Sandy Metel said, her son Aydin, now 15, had mild asthma. "But within the first year, he was hospitalized five times ... with asthma related issues," she said.
    Welcome to the Louisville area, she said her doctors told them.

  • Federal program will allow Kentucky schools to provide more students with free meals

    By Valarie Honeycutt Spears
    Lexington Herald-Leader

    This fall, all students could receive free meals at some schools in an estimated 100 Kentucky districts, including Fayette, as part of a federal program that has expanded.
    The Community Eligibility Provision, a federal program that started in 2010 as a pilot in Kentucky and other states, will allow schools to provide more students with free meals, no matter their families' incomes.

  • Divided board votes to give superintendent 18-month extension to establish residency

    A divided Marion County Board of Education has voted to give Superintendent Taylora Schlosser an additional 18 months to establish her residency in Marion County.

  • High school report cards available to pick up

    Parents of high school students can now pick up report cards at Marion County High School.

    Office hours are 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. However, the office is closed from noon until 1 p.m. for lunch.

  • Alleged abuse in Room 126

    A group of local parents are suing the Marion County Public School System, Superintendent Taylora Schlosser, current and former MCPS administrators and a teacher for alleged abuse of their special needs children.
    The lawsuit was filed in Marion Circuit Court Thursday, June 12, on behalf of Paul and Virginia Boone of Lebanon, Elizabeth J. Johnson of St. Francis and Stacey Hall of Lebanon, all parents of special needs children who attend or have attended Marion County High School.

  • Still going strong

    The first Old Mill Day was held in 1989, and for a quarter century, the celebration has remained a time when the Bradfordsville community comes together.

    Admittedly, it was a noticeably smaller affair when it first began.

    “We had the supper. We had fireworks. We had music,” Bradfordsville Mayor David Edelen recalled.

    The idea for Old Mill Day, in a way, rose out of what many in the community considered a sad event — the closing of the Bradfordsville School in 1984.

  • Parents suing teacher, MCPS for alleged abuse of special needs children

    A group of local parents are suing the Marion County Public School System, Superintendent Taylora Schlosser, current and former MCPS administrators and a teacher for alleged abuse of their special needs children.
    The lawsuit was filed in Marion Circuit Court Thursday, June 12, on behalf of Paul and Virginia Boone of Lebanon, Elizabeth J. Johnson of St. Francis and Stacey Hall of Lebanon, all parents of special needs children who attend or have attended Marion County High School.