Today's News

  • Monk invasion

    Men of courage and spirit traveled across the globe and visited Lebanon along the way. They brought with them gifts, merchandise and a message of peace. These men taught, learned and loved. 

    And while they may never return, they sure left something behind. 

    Of course, I’m talking about the monks from the Tashi Kyil Monastery, in India.

    I got to experience the monks and their lessons last week in a way different from most. 

    Through the lens. 

  • Thoughts to consider before granting a pipeline easement

    By Terry Geoghegan and Tom FitzGerald

    Landowners  contacted by the Bluegrass Pipeline Partners LLC, the Williams Company or one of their representatives about selling an easement for the construction of a 24-inch pressurized natural gas liquids pipeline across their property, rightfully have questions about whether granting such an easement is in their interest. 

  • Kynect me not? Columnist has trouble with exchange

    By Ryan Craig

    Editor, The Todd County Standard

    Despite the hubbub concerning the Affordable Care Act or Obama Care or (depending on your political leaning) the end of civilization or the beginning of a beautiful tomorrow, I look forward to trying to get different, cheaper insurance.

    Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m kind of like Switzerland when it comes to the idea of a marketplace to shop for insurance.

  • Celebrate Bluegrass history during Archives Month

    From a historical perspective, it is not much of a stretch to say that some of the Western Hemisphere’s first farmers were Kentuckians.

    That’s because the Red River Gorge in Eastern Kentucky is just one of a few hotspots in North and South America where archeologists say modern agriculture took its first steps. Early bands of pre-historic settlers found its soil and climate ideal to domesticate such wild plants as the sunflower, whose seeds added both flavor and nutrition to their food.

  • Haunted houses, corn maze open for business

    By Nick Schrager

    Enterprise correspondent

    The month of October brings many things; orange and red leaves, ghouls, goblins, pumpkins, and Indian corn. 

    Marion County however, will get that and more!

    Residents can get ready to get their scare on at XB Arena with their annual haunted house called Anxiety Overload.  

  • Preset crypts will allow more burials

    Anyone who has driven by the Lebanon National Cemetery recently may be wondering why crews were digging up so much dirt.

    “We are turning 250 traditional casket areas into 552 grave sites,” said Patrick Lovett, the director of Kentucky National Cemetery Complex.

    They are doing this by installing “preset lawn crypts.”

  • ‘Tellebration!’ is Nov. 16

    Marion County’s inaugural Tellebration! storytelling event will be held from 7-9 p.m. Nov. 16 at the Marion County Library. 

    The event is being sponsored by the Friends of the Library, and all proceeds will go to benefit library operations. Local storytellers and bards will share tales and songs for an adult audience, meaning tales will be more involved and use subtle humor better appreciated by an older audience.

  • Game Plan, Oct. 16

    Oct. 16


    Girls district semifinals at MCHS

    Oct. 17


    Lady Knights at  Pulaski County, 8 p.m.


    Marion County at Campbellsville All comers


  • Football fan & female

    As a college football fan, I welcome the mini-playoff that will be used to decide the champion at the end of the 2014 season.

    Better yet, once the television networks realize how much money they can make, I fully expect the powers-that-be in college football to expand the playoff to include more teams. 

    A selection committee -- similar to the ones that pick the teams for the NCAA basketball tournaments -- will pick the four teams that will be included in the 2014 mini-playoff.

  • Good deed, good game

    The Marion County Knights and Lady Knights did battle in order to raise awareness for breast cancer during a double header on Oct. 8. The lines were painted dark pink in honor of the occasion, and door prizes were given to the women in the audience. 

    “It felt great and we did a great job of painting the field up and lighting the lanterns and getting everyone involved,” Knights Coach Greg Conley said.