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Today's News

  • More Ham Days Memories...
  • Marion County schools are ‘proficient’

    Marion County Public Schools are improving, according to the latest K-PREP scores, which were released Friday by the Kentucky Department of Education.
    The district’s overall score rose from 68.5 in 2012-13 to 69.6 in 2013-14.
    Based on its score, Marion County is considered a proficient school district, and it placed in the 82nd percentile, which means it is among the top 20 percent of public school districts in Kentucky.
    The average district score statewide was 68.7 for 2013-14, which was up from 64.3 the previous year.

  • Former UK player was celebrating game-winning TD when he fell over railing at stadium

    By Beth Musgrave
    Lexington Herald-Leader

    A former University of Kentucky offensive lineman became so excited after UK's game-winning fourth-quarter interception and touchdown Saturday that he caught his foot on a step, lost his balance and went over the railing of the upper deck of Commonwealth Stadium, a witness said Sunday.
    Jay Blanton, a spokesman for UK, said Brad Durham was in serious condition at UK Chandler Medical Center. Durham allegedly fell 35 to 40 feet onto the lower level of the stadium.

  • Honoring Our Fallen Heroes

    The memorial honor Marion County Sheriff's Deputy Anthony Rakes, who was killed Nov. 14, 2012, and other emergency personnel killed in the line of duty is open for viewing.
     

  • State Rep race: Incumbent facing challenger from Hodgenville

    Nov. 4 will be the first election using the most recently approved state legislative districts. While Marion County remains part of the 24th District, the district itself has changed. Green and LaRue counties have replaced Casey County and part of Pulaski County.
    Incumbent State Representative Terry Mills, a Democrat from Lebanon, is seeking re-election, while Alex LaRue, a Republican from Hodgenville, hopes to claim the seat.
    Mills said he is running again for the same reason he first ran in a special election in 2010 — he wants to serve his community.

  • America’s newest battle – fighting Ebola

    The wars military men and women fight on America’s behalf are not always on the battlefield, or at least not what most of us envision when we hear the word “battlefield.” I was vividly reminded of that when I heard the news last week that more than 60 airmen and women from Kentucky’s Air National Guard were preparing to depart to Senegal. Their mission is to help establish a cargo-processing hub for Operation United Assistance, the international effort to battle Ebola in West Africa.

  • A real-time look at the impact of domestic violence

    Each fall, the National Census of Domestic Violence Services takes a real-time, 24-hour look at the true impact domestic violence has on our country.
    Nearly 90 percent of the United States’ care and prevention programs participate, including Kentucky’s. According to the survey’s latest findings, they provided shelter to more than 36,000 victims on Sept. 13, 2013, the latest year in which information is available, and another 30,000 received non-residential help ranging from counseling to legal advocacy.

  • Newspapers are community

    By Keith Anderson
    Director of News, ECM Publishers

    There are hundreds of beautiful towns in the United States. And each of them has a claim to fame. Whether it’s the Fire Hydrant Capital of the world in Albertville, Alabama, the giant statue of Paul Bunyan welcoming visitors to Brainerd, Minnesota, or the giant ice cream sundae statue in LeMars, Iowa, every city has a desire to be known for something.

  • Newspapers are the ‘tie that binds’ people together

    By Robert M. Williams, Jr.
    National Newspaper Association President

    What do you care most about in life?
    Most of us would put family at, or near, the top of such a list. Friends would be there. So would our jobs or businesses, our livelihoods. Our homes. Maybe our pets. Our hobbies and pastimes. Add in those around us: Neighbors, the community, etc.
    That’s our world, our “sphere of influence.” Whatever happens to those who inhabit that place in our hearts and lives means something to us.
    We monitor.

  • Editorial Cartoon: National Newspapers Week