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Today's News

  • Special-called meetings scheduled for March 16

    The Lebanon City Council is scheduled to have a special-called meeting at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 16, at city hall.

    The items on the agenda for the special-called meeting are a discussion of city police vehicles, a discussion regarding a preliminary proposal for Enhanced 911 mapping products and services, and a request from Channel 6 to use the city's back-up tower.

  • Japanese Relief Fund is being created

    The City of Lebanon, Marion County Economic Development and Marion County Fiscal Court are creating a Japanese Relief Fund in the aftermath of the recent earthquake.

    The 8.9-magnitude earthquake struck early in the morning of March 11. At least 300 people are reported to have died, according to the Christian Science Monitor. The earthquake cause the collapse of buildings as far as 240 miles from the epicenter and created 30-foot high tsunamis.

  • Marion County falls in state semifinals

    Marion County started strong, fell behind, fought back to regain the lead and had multiple chances to send the game to overtime, but in the end, Manual survived in the Saturday morning semifinal match-up in the Houchens Industries/KHSAA Girls Sweet Sixteen.

    Manual won by a final score of 56-54.

    Here is a recap of the game as it happened:

    The Lady Knights jumped out to a quick 7-0 lead only three minutes into the game forcing Manual to burn an early timeout.  Currently Marion County leads 7-4 with 4:10 left in the 1st quarter.

  • School board unanimously approves drug-testing resolution

    The Marion County Board of Education unanimously voted Tuesday evening, March 8, to adopt a resolution for a drug-testing program at Marion County High School for the 2011-12 school year.

  • Educated Public

    As the Marion County Board of Education goes through the process of hiring a new superintendent for the second time in less than two years, its members must be aware that everyone is watching.

    We’ve said it before and we’ll repeat it here: The selection of a superintendent is the single most important decision the board will make. Other decisions are certainly important, but none are as big as who will be the next leader of our school district.

  • Life is good for Charlie Sheen, or is it?

    Watching someone self-destruct is disturbing.

    Watching someone you love self-destruct is torture.

    So, last week while most people were laughing at Charlie Sheen, star of “Two And A Half Men,” and his bizarre interviews on television and the radio, I couldn’t help but feel sorry for him.

  • Prison bill is landmark legislation

    Long after a legislative session is in the history books, it is often remembered by just one or two of its most prominent bills. Early last week, the General Assembly gave its overwhelming approval to the one that will almost certainly top this year’s list.

  • Do you have a tornado plan?

    By Donna Carman

    Landmark News Service

     

    If Tuesday morning (March 1) had dawned like Monday morning, then we could say that March was roaring in like a lion, so hopefully it would go out like a lamb. 

    But Tuesday morning was much tamer, so look out on March 31.

  • Junior Mister is Saturday, March 26

    The Marion County High School Beta Club is pleased to present the 6th annual Marion County Junior Mister Pageant Saturday, March 26, at 7 p.m. in the Roby Dome.

    The pageant was designed to mirror the Marion County Junior Miss competition with participants competing in interview, fitness, poise and talent competitions but this pageant was for high school boys instead of girls - hence the name "Junior Mister."

  • Judicial center opening delayed over woodworking issue

    The Marion County Judicial Center opening, which had previously been rescheduled for March, is likely to be postponed again. Marion County Judge/Executive John G. Mattingly said the woodworking did not meet the specifications prepared by the architect.

    "The evaluator came down and said it wasn't in compliance with AWI standards," Mattingly said.