Today's News

  • Turtleman keeps his focus on making people happy

    The Turtleman still has plenty of fans.
    When Ernie Brown Jr. dropped by the Marion County Heritage Center Thursday, fans including a family, a couple and a pair of missionaries took time to pose for pictures and get autographs from the Turtleman.
    The second season of Brown’s Animal Planet program, “Call of Wildman,” started June 2 with episodes featuring the Turtleman catching a llama on a Marion County farm, venomous snakes at a community pool in Danville, and a skunk.
    "We're filming every day," Brown said.

  • Between sessions, legislative work continues

    As you may know, the interim is in full swing with committees continuing to meet to study new issues and to review the progress of newly enacted laws. These committees are made up of both Senate and House members and are known as Interim Joint Committees. I chair the Veterans, Military Affairs, and Public Protection Committee and the Budget Review Subcommittee on Transportation. I serve on nine other committees and task forces that tackle issues ranging from to energy to education to health and welfare to economic development and tourism, among others.

  • Big Brother is listening

    By Sen. Rand Paul

    When Americans expressed outrage last week over the seizure and surveillance of Verizon's client data by the National Security Agency, President Obama responded: "In the abstract, you can complain about Big Brother... but when you actually look at the details, I think we've struck the right balance."

  • Relay is a reality check

    I’m ashamed to admit this, but Friday night was the first Marion County Relay for Life event I’ve ever participated in. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve attended numerous Relay for Life events, but always from behind the lens of my camera. I’ve never actually been a part of the event, so to speak.

  • What’s wrong with a little pipeline through KY?

    By Sister Claire McGowan, OP
    Guest columnist

    Some local citizens have heard about a proposed Bluegrass Pipeline to run through Nelson and 17 other Kentucky counties on its way from Pennsylvania and New York to the Gulf area. Some haven’t. Many are seeking more information. It might be helpful to lay out some of the issues from the perspective of community sustainability.

  • Looking at agriculture and Kentucky’s economy

    While it should surprise no one that agriculture is one of Kentucky’s biggest industries, we got a much clearer picture late last month of just how much of an impact it has on our economy.
    According to the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, the commonwealth’s farmers are the foundation for more than $46 billion in annual revenue.

  • Corrections and clarifications - June 19, 2013

    The following fifth grade Glasscock Elementary students were inadvertently omitted from the all A’s and B’s honor roll: Jasmine Benningfield, Kristin Downs, Madison Davis, and Ryan Lee Hayes.


    Marion County held its 17th annual Relay for Life event Friday and Saturday at Lebanon Middle School. This year's event raised more than $51,500, a considerable increase from last year’s total, which was approximately $40,000. Team money and donations are still coming in and can be turned in to add to this year's team totals. Contact Liz Lawson or Lisa Sandusky to turn in any further donations.

  • Why the bass go deep

    In last week’s article I told you that a majority of a lake’s bass spend most of their time in deep water.
    However, I neglected to tell you why! Those of you who are inquisitive may have looked it up on Google or, heaven forbid, read some magazine articles.
    If so, you discovered that bass go deep seeking cooler water, water with more dissolved oxygen in it, or maybe, as I actually read somewhere, “Bass spend time in deep water to avoid the bright sunlight, since they don’t have eyelids.”

  • Lebanon to host Swing for the Cure

    By Nick Schrager
    Enterprise Correspondent

    From 9 a.m., to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, adrenaline will flow as America’s favorite pastime is played in the name of a good cause — breast cancer awareness.
    Swing for the Cure, a series of baseball games, will be held for the first time in Lebanon on June 22-23. The games will primarily be played at Graham Memorial Park, though some games might be held at the Marion County High School.  
    “It will fun,” Matt Thompson, the organizer of the event, said.