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Today's News

  • Kentucky gains a second historically black college

    By Brent Schanding
    The State Journal

    A small Louisville college could rival Kentucky State University in recruiting and educating black students in the Commonwealth and beyond.
    Earlier this week, administrators at Simmons College of Kentucky — a private four-year college whose campus is largely tucked into a block of the Limerick community near downtown Louisville — announced it had gained status from the U.S. Department of Education as a historically black college.

  • Raising awareness about autism

    Hundreds of people gathered Saturday at Graham Memorial Park in Lebanon to raise awareness of autism spectrum disorders and to celebrate individuals who live with those conditions every day.
    Lisa Nally-Martin, the founder of Working the Puzzle for Autism, welcomed everyone to the fifth annual walk April 18.
    “Each of these kids that are standing here, as we all know, they are the ones that get the benefit out of this,” Nally-Martin said.

  • Lebanon woman injured in burglary Friday

    A Lebanon woman is listed in satisfactory condition at University Hospital in Louisville after she was attacked in her home on Friday.

    The 62-year-old victim was attacked in the morning April 17 at 220 E. Chandler Street. At 3:17 a.m. Friday, the Lebanon Police responded to a call reporting that someone was trying to break into her house.

    When the police arrived on the scene, they requested Marion County EMS, who transported the victim to Spring View Hospital. She was later transported to U of L.

  • Shoplifter arrested after shoving steaks down his pants

    Loretto Foodland is known for its low meat prices, but apparently they weren’t low enough for a Raywick man who was caught stuffing steaks down his pants last week.

  • Car break-ins occur across the county

    Several vehicle break-ins in Marion County recently should serve as reminders to lock your car doors even if it’s parked in your own driveway.
    On April 12, a vehicle parked in Cozy Corner parking lot was broken into and $80 in cash was stolen, as well as a debit card, according to Marion County Sheriff Jimmy Clements. Two male juveniles attempted to use the debit card at U.S. Bank in Loretto at 2:04 a.m., and surveillance camera footage enabled law enforcement to identify them, Clements said. Both juveniles have been charged with theft by unlawful taking.

  • Sense of self

    Jill Edlin sits next to a platform where water bubbles float through a tube. LED lights add color to the tube and other locations around the room.
    She holds what appears to be an oversized padded block, which serves as a light switch. When she turns the block, the LED light changes to match the color on top.

  • New road to Maker’s Mark is open

    The Marion County Fiscal Court has voted to open the new road to Maker’s Mark.
    The court held a public hearing about possibly closing a portion of Burke Springs Road and opening the new road on April 2. On Thursday, the court voted to open the new road.
    During the April 2 public hearing, residents near Maker’s Mark expressed concerns about closing part of Burke Springs Road and about safety issues on the new road. One particular concern related to lines of sight at an intersection near a utility pole.

  • Steve Lowery recognized for First Amendment efforts

    By Forrest Berkshire
    Landmark News Service

    Steve Lowery, a former journalist who spent more than a decade covering Nelson and Marion counties, has been honored posthumously for his contributions to journalism.
    Lowery was awarded the James Madison Award, which recognizes individuals for service to the First Amendment, April 14 by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center at the University of Kentucky.

  • Moving forward

    In April of 2014, Marion County Public Schools hosted a strategic planning summit and invited members of the community to help them develop big dreams for the district. District officials organized another summit April 14 at Centre Square to update the public on its progress.
    Mike Cecil, chairman of the Marion County Board of Education, opened last week’s session by saying that more than 100 “dreamers” attended the 2014 event. This year, he said around 150 “believers” took part in the summit.

  • School board seeks comments on public comment policy

    The Marion County Board of Education heard reports on three committees, including one that is reviewing the board’s policy on public comments, during its April 18 meeting.
    Board Member Kaelin Reed reported that the public comment committee is looking into policy matters regarding how much advance notice should be given for someone to be on the agenda and how much time the board should set aside for public comments during its meetings.