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Today's News

  • Popoca wins Pokey Pig

    Around 300 runners and walkers participated in the Pokey Pig 5K road race Saturday in Lebanon during the Ham Days festival.

    Geovanni Popoca from Anaheim, Calif., was the overall winner, finishing in 16 minutes, 32 seconds.

    Popoca also claimed the best first year male runner prize and the winner of the 18-24-year-old male category.

    Bekah Southwood was the first female to cross the line, completing the race in 21:24. Southwood also won first place in the 13-17-year-old female category.

  • KSP conducting death investigation

    The Kentucky State Police are investigating the death of Robert T. Hughes, 21, of Lebanon.

    He was found Monday, Sept. 27, at approximately 4:52 p.m. in his residence by family members.

  • Suicide is preventable

    Suicide Prevention Week just ended on Sept. 11. The topic of suicide is an important one: suicide kills more than most people realize but is very preventable. Nationwide, there are two suicides for every homicide. In Kentucky, there is a three to one ratio. Suicide strikes certain demographic groups more than others. White men, those in jail, and people living on some Native American reservations have higher rates of suicide than what is found in the general population. Among teenagers and young adults suicide is one of top three killers nationwide.

  • Boy's golf picks up the pace

    The Marion County High School boys golf team looks to be a threat at the upcoming region tournament as they appear to have hit their stride late in the season. The Knights finished fifth overall in the third annual Marion County Invitational at Rosewood Golf Club Saturday. They shot of a team score of 326, behind champions Ballard (305), Boyle County (311), Male (320) and Central Hardin (322).  The biggest surprise of the day, however, was the near miss of Marion County's  Joseph Elder.

  • Loretto mayoral candidate: Robert G. Miles

    Robert G. Miles

  • 'Spectacular'

    Clear skies and cooler temperatures welcomed an estimated crowd of more than 30,000 people to Marion County Country Ham Days over the weekend.

    "Overall, I thought things ran very, very smoothly," Marion County Chamber of Commerce President Brad Mattingly said. "We had spectacular weather."

    This year, 4,780 breakfasts were served over the weekend, 500 more than last year, Mattingly said.

    Individual events drew good numbers as well.

  • Washington County knocks off Knights 3-0

    Electricity and water don't mix well but the two combined Friday night at John J. Boswell Field for a defensive explosion.

    Emotions ran high as the rain poured from the sky during the first and second quarters of the rivalry game between Marion and Washington counties. Things would cool off but not by much.

    After all the fuss, three points would be all that separated the border rivals.

    Washington County beat the Knights 3-0, the only points of the game coming late in the third quarter.

  • Property owner is on the clock

    Frank Spragens had one question when he arrived at the Sept. 20 meeting of the Lebanon Property Maintenance Code Enforcement Board.   "Is this the Inquisition?" he said, jokingly.

    Spragens owns three properties - 322 and 412 S. Proctor Knott Ave and 226 W. Chandler Street - that have been cited four times apiece under the city's property maintenance ordinance. All together, the fines issued against those properties have reached a total of $4,050.

  • Job well done

    Sore feet, aching backs, and dry mouths from eating too much country ham... many Marion Countians are probably still experiencing their own version of a "Ham Days Hangover" after volunteering during the annual festival, which took place this past weekend.

    It's a lot of work for the Marion County Chamber of Commerce and its countless volunteers who spend all weekend working tirelessly so that more than 30,000 people can enjoy one of the top 10 fall festivals in Kentucky.

  • Making the grade?

    Great things are happening in Marion County Public Schools, according to Superintendent Donald Smith, but recently released test scores show that some of its students, and three of its seven schools, are falling behind.

    Last week, the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) released test scores, which showed that local African American students are struggling in mathematics and students with disabilities are falling behind in reading.