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Today's News

  • Leading the way

    In the first weeks of Eli Bright’s life, doctors told his parents he would likely die before his first birthday.
    He was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 1, which is the most severe of the four types of SMA. The condition can create problems with breathing and eating, much less crawling or walking. It’s the No. 1 genetic killer of children.
    Eli’s parents were completely devastated.

  • Marion County becomes hurricane haven for Florida evacuees

    Just days after Hurricane Harvey slammed Texas, reportedly killing 70 people and causing billions of dollars in damage, nearly 7 million Florida residents evacuated the Sunshine State, escaping the wrath of Hurricane Irma.
    Five of those evacuees, along with four cats, sought refuge in the Heart of Kentucky. A group from Melbourne Beach, Florida, traveled to Marion County on Sept. 9, and stayed at Butch and Kathy Cecil’s guest home in Raywick.

  • Celebrate Ham Days responsibly

    Local law enforcement officials encourage everyone to enjoy the Marion County Country Ham Days Festival this weekend, but do so responsibly or you could end up in jail.
    “People who are visibly under the influence or involved in any sort of altercation – they are going to go to jail,” Lebanon Police Chief Wally Brady said. “That’s just the bottom line. We’re not going to tolerate it.”

  • Ham Days Country Store is open

    The Marion County Country Ham Days Country Store is open in the Farmers National Bank Annex on Main Street in downtown Lebanon. The Country Store hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
    Purchase official 2017 Marion County Country Ham Days merchandise, including collector t-shirts in adult, toddler and youth sizes, collector lapel pins, caps, hooded sweatshirts, garden flags, coffee mugs and rocks glasses. You can also purchase tickets to the Little Texas-Magnolia Vale concert and the ham breakfast.

  • Education briefs

    (The following education briefs were gathered during the Marion County Board of Education’s meeting on Thursday, Sept. 14.)

    Superintendent’s report
    • Monday, Oct. 9, will be a professional learning day for MCPS staff. Students will not attend school that day.

  • New rates for Lebanon Water Works Company customers

    On Sept. 11, the Lebanon City Council approved the second reading and final passage of Ordinance No. 2017-06, which amends both the meter charge and the O & M charge (volumetric rate) for water service provided by the Lebanon Water Works Company. The new ordinance sets the new monthly meter charge at $7.35 per meter each month and the new volume charge at $3.35 per 100 cubic feet of water used.  Lebanon Water Works customers can expect to see the new rates reflected on their next bill, which will be mailed on Sept. 29, and will be due on Oct. 15.

  • Tragedies & Triumphs

    Gravel Switch Methodist Church sits on a hill.
    Not a big hill.
    And not nearly as steep as the mountain Ollie Mae Wicker had to climb to become its pastor.
    Tragedies and triumphs have marked the life of the native and current resident of neighboring Bradfordsville.
    Her dad, Foster Cook, was blinded in an accident and took his own life when his daughter was barely a year and a half old.
    Her mom, Louise Whitehouse, was 25 when she was killed by her second husband. Ollie was only six.

  • Hurricane Harvey relief efforts

    Master Sgt. Travis Greenwell (right), son of Margie and Jody Greenwell of Loretto, arrives at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston, Texas, Aug. 30, to support Hurricane Harvey relief efforts. Also pictured is Chief Master Sgt. Derek Whitmore (left). The Airmen will support aeromedical evacuation by removing patients from ambulances, processing them for air movement, and transporting them to a military aircraft to evacuate the area.
     

  • ‘Servants of the Harvest’

    Looking for someone to help you have a healthy diet and a relationship with the Lord?
    If so, the doctor is in.
    In Gravel Switch that is.
    Actually, the 16-acre farm where Dr. Sharon Paul hopes to help others is about one mile south of the northeastern Marion County community, along Hwy. 337.
    The tract she has dubbed “Servants of the Harvest was discovered by the Michigan native after a five-year search.
    “My criteria was high,” says Dr. Paul. “I wanted a place suited to no-till, organic gardening.”

  • BackPack program looking for community support

    For the past 10 years, the Marion County Community Education program has participated in Feeding America’s BackPack Program, which is designed to provide needy children who are at-risk of facing hunger with food for the weekend when school meals are not available.
    However, in recent years, the program has faced a new obstacle: funding. In the past, a large portion of the program’s funding came from a grant that is no longer available.